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I've been making HTML sites for a while and I've always feared making forms so I've resorted to using form generators.

This time round I've decided I want to do it myself. I know the basics that a form looks something like this:

<form id="mail_form">
        <div>
            <input type="text" name="subject" id="subject"/>
        </div>
        <div>
            <textarea name="message" id="message"></textarea>
        </div>
        <div>
            <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Send"/>
        </div>
</form>

But to make the form actually work, what in your opinion is the best way of doing this which is simple and effective?

Thanks

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1  
What doesn't work? –  John Saunders Jan 11 '11 at 9:21
    
what server technology do you want to use? –  karlis Jan 11 '11 at 9:23
    
@John the form doesn't send. I'm looking for the best script to send web forms. –  Tim Jan 11 '11 at 9:25
    
@karlis I'd ideally like it to run on a linux server. –  Tim Jan 11 '11 at 9:31
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First off, I'd suggest paring the form down to its essentials:

<form id="mail_form">
    <input type="text" name="subject" id="subject"/>
    <textarea name="message" id="message"></textarea>
    <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Send"/>
</form>

Then add in some semantic information:

<form id="mail_form">
    <label for="subject">Subject:</label>
    <input type="text" name="subject" id="subject"/>

    <label for="message">Message:</label>
    <textarea name="message" id="message"></textarea>

    <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Send"/>
</form>

Then use fieldset elements to segment the form into related components:

<form id="mail_form">
    <fieldset class="message">
        <label for="subject">Subject:</label>
        <input type="text" name="subject" id="subject"/>

        <label for="message">Message:</label>
        <textarea name="message" id="message"></textarea>
    </fieldset>

    <fieldset class="submitReset">
        <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Send"/>
    </fieldset>
</form>

At this point you need to add information to the form's opening tag to give instruction as to what you want to happen on submit, and how:

<form id="mail_form" action="http://path.to.server-side-script.com/script.php" method="post" <!-- or 'get' -->>

Once the submit button is clicked (or the form is submitted by whatever means), the information will be sent to the server-side/back-end script located at "http://path.to.server-side-script.com/script.php".

Unlike JS there's no same-domain policy to worry about, and you can (though probably shouldn't) submit information to any form accessible with your browser.


Edited in response to comment (to question) by OP:

...the form doesn't send. I'm looking for the best script to send web forms.

You don't need a script to send the form, all you need to do is add the action and method attributes to the form's opening tag. The browser will take care of submission all by itself. You do, however, need a script to process/handle the form on your server. But that's a whole other question, and is only answerable if you give details about your back-end/server-side resources.

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@John, I'd assume, from this answer, that the browser would submit the form to the script located at "path.to.server-side-script.com/script.php"; using post. Did I miss something? I confess I left out the enctype options, but I think this should work to submit the form okay. (Since he added no information about his back-end solution I chose not to try and speculate, and note that that is 'a whole other question' once the information is provided.) –  David Thomas Jan 11 '11 at 9:32
    
yes, you missed something! You edited your answer. I saw it without the details on the <form> element. –  John Saunders Jan 11 '11 at 9:35
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You need to POST it to a script so that it can be processed.

In the tag, you need to include an action and method attribute. The action specifies a webpage on which the data will be sent to, and the method is how it will be sent. There are two ways to send the data, either using POST or GET, though in your case POST is probably the better option.

Your will look like this:

myform.php

<form id="mail_form" action="mypost.php" method="POST">
        <div>
            <input type="text" name="subject" id="subject"/>
        </div>
        <div>
            <textarea name="message" id="message"></textarea>
        </div>
        <div>
            <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Send"/>
        </div>
</form>

You would have something like the following to access the data:

mypost.php

<?PHP
     echo $_POST['subject'];
     echo "\<br\>";
     echo $_POST['message'];
?>

This will simply print out the value that the user put in. You can choose to do whatever you want with it.

Of course, this way only works with PHP. You can set the action to any kind of document, but you need some server-side scripting language to retrieve and manipulate the data.

For further reading see http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_forms.asp.

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You require a "backend" to make this work. This would usually be ASP or PHP.

When you click the "Submit" button your browser will send the data to the back end where code would do actions based on the data submitted. Usually it would store this data into a database.

You should probably look at PHP its probably easier to get into and the hosting costs are generally cheaper

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You need to specify form's action and target properties and method (POST or GET).

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As the other responses pointed out, you need a service back-end to handle the request in the server.

If you are looking to work with PHP, I would recommend you getting WAMP to run Apache/PHP in your computer, and here is a very simple tutorial: http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_forms.asp

If you are planning to use ASP .NET, you could get the software from http://www.asp.net, and they have very nice tutorials on their website also.

There are other server side programs you could use also, such as Python or Ruby. It is all a question of exploring and finding what you like.

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