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someone in my team stumbled upon a peculiar use of the ref keyword on a reference type

class A { /* ... */ } 

class B
{    
    public void DoSomething(ref A myObject)
    {
       // ...
    }
}

Is there any reason someone sane would do such a thing? I can't find a use for this in C#

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marked as duplicate by ChrisF Mar 14 '13 at 12:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See also this question. –  Dimitri C. Feb 9 '11 at 11:15
    
Indeed, I missed that question while searching. Good catch –  Luk Feb 9 '11 at 15:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Let

class A
{
    public string Blah { get; set; }
}

void Do (ref A a)
{
    a = new A { Blah = "Bar" };
}

then

A a = new A { Blah = "Foo" };
Console.WriteLine(a.Blah); // Foo
Do (ref a);
Console.WriteLine(a.Blah); // Bar

But if just

void Do (A a)
{
    a = new A { Blah = "Bar" };
}

then

A a = new A { Blah = "Foo" };
Console.WriteLine(a.Blah); // Foo
Do (a);
Console.WriteLine(a.Blah); // Foo
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1  
+1 for an explicit example of what Oded is talking about, even if it was already fairly clear. –  Karl Knechtel Jan 11 '11 at 9:54
    
Thanks a lot, that makes it crystal clear! –  Luk Jan 11 '11 at 13:07
    
@Luk: Glad it helped! :) –  abatishchev Jan 11 '11 at 13:23

Only if they want to change the reference to the object passed in as myObject to a different one.

public void DoSomething(ref A myObject)
{
   myObject = new A(); // The object in the calling function is now the new one 
}

Chances are this is not what they want to do and ref is not needed.

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The ref keyword is usefull if the method is supposed to change the reference stored in the variable passed to the method. If you do not use ref you can not change the reference only changes the object itself will be visible outside the method.

this.DoSomething(myObject);
// myObject will always point to the same instance here

this.DoSomething(ref myObject);
// myObject could potentially point to a completely new instance here
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There's nothing peculiar with this. You reference variables if you want to return several values from a method or just don't want to reassign the return value to the object you've passed in as an argument.

Like this:

int bar = 4;
foo(ref bar);

instead of:

int bar = 4;
bar = foo(bar);

Or if you want to retrieve several values:

int bar = 0;
string foobar = "";
foo(ref bar, ref foobar);
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In fact, OP is talking about reference types, not value types, like int –  abatishchev Jan 11 '11 at 9:58
    
So you're saying references is not used with value types? –  peterthegreat Jan 11 '11 at 10:18
    
afaik, no. value types are fully copied every time, i.e. by value. that's why they are called value types –  abatishchev Jan 11 '11 at 11:52
    
Now I understand what you mean. I never thought about that the OP used an actual object. I was very tired when reading it in the first place, being up for 24+ hours straight. –  peterthegreat Jan 11 '11 at 21:36

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