Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

function onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms){
                document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src1;
                setTimeout("onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms)", time_ms);
                document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src2;

        }

This is my given code. I would like to access the same value of parameters from onload_animate(param1, param2,...) in setTimeout() in each recursive call. How can it be possible??

share|improve this question
2  
You should really try and accept some answers to your previous questions. –  Matt Jan 11 '11 at 9:50
    
Okay... I got the point of your statement!! I will accept the answer which works!! But, how about if there are more answers that can be accepted Matt?? Thank you at last for your guidance! :) –  zdcobran Jan 11 '11 at 9:51
    
Infinite recursion is a great way to cause a stack overflow! –  Sam Dufel Jan 11 '11 at 9:53
    
possible duplicate of How can I pass a parameter to a setTimeout() callback? –  Jonas Elfström Jan 11 '11 at 9:53
    
You should choose the best one. Which was the most helpful, most detailed? Which answer are other people with a similar problem as yours most likely to find helpful? –  Matt Jan 11 '11 at 9:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is considered bad practise to pass setTimeout a string. This is similar to using eval(), which is evil in JavaScript.

function onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms){
    document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src1;

    setTimeout(function () {
        onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms);
    }, time_ms);

    document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src2;
};

Will capture the variables so they are available within setTimeout. Note that this function will currently loop forever; you need some form of exit (usually checking a conditional; e.g. has time_ms expired yet?)

Your code should probably look something like this;

function onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms) {
    document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src1;

    setTimeout(function () {
        onload_animate(id_name, img_src2, img_src1, time_ms);
    }, time_ms);
};

See this snippet for a working example: http://www.jsfiddle.net/3vKnW/.

JavaScript does not wait for setTimeout to complete. It is asynchronous. JavaScript will hit the setTimeout line, schedule the function to be ran in time_ms time, but will then go back and continue executing where it left off.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I am trying to animate a picture continuously. So, I should keep on running this function; right?? But, still it is not working! I have put alert() statement after the last statement of this function, and this alert() statement execute only once. –  zdcobran Jan 11 '11 at 9:56
    
That is what I was trying to do!! Thank you Matt! :) –  zdcobran Jan 11 '11 at 10:04

If you put the settimeout callback into an anonymous function it should work. That way the parameters stay in scope.

function onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms){
                document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src1;
                setTimeout(
                    function(){
                         onload_animate(id_name, img_src1, img_src2, time_ms);
                    }, time_ms);
                document.getElementById(id_name).src = img_src2;

        }

Try reading up about javascript closures, they are very useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @Laurencek for providing me tutorial about closures! –  zdcobran Jan 11 '11 at 10:12

Wouldn't it be better to use setInterval?

var int=self.setInterval("onload_animate()",time_ms);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.