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I have this:

  int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21};
  int max=tal[0];
  for(int i=0;i<tal.length;i++){
      if(tal[i]>5){
          max=tal[i];
      }
  }
  System.out.println("Biggest: "+ max);

Im reading Java, how can i make print out the next biggest number

share|improve this question
    
Isn't what you already do ? –  Riduidel Jan 11 '11 at 10:08
    
he's getting the max from an array. What he wants is to get the number which is greater than all the numbers from the same array but less than the max. –  Vladimir Ivanov Jan 11 '11 at 10:09
    
You need to make it clear what you mean -- do you mean the second biggest number? At the moment, your code is failing to print out the biggest number because you're checking tal[i] > 5 instead of tal[i] > max. –  Stuart Golodetz Jan 11 '11 at 10:10
1  
@Vladimir Ivanov He's not getting the max, he's getting last number that is greater than 5. –  nan Jan 11 '11 at 10:12
1  
If there were two 21's in the array should the second biggest one also be 21 or 12? –  Cornelius Jan 11 '11 at 10:16

11 Answers 11

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming you don't want to sort the array, as some of the other answers suggest:

int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21};
int max = tal[0];
int previous = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
for (int i = 1; i < tal.length; i++) {
    if (tal[i] > max) {
        previous = max;
        max = tal[i];
    }
    else if (tal[i] > previous) {
        previous = tal[i];
    }
}
System.out.println("Biggest: "+ max);
System.out.println("2nd Biggest: "+ previous);

Credits to @Andreas_D for the original code, which I modified to fix a problem.

There are some extra conditions you may need to check for; for example, the array needs to contain at least two elements for a valid result. Realistically, I would only opt for a solution such as this if you expect to be dealing with large inputs, and if you always need the second largest (or largest) number. Otherwise, just go with the Arrays.sort solution.

Because I'm mostly a .NET guy, I'll show you the Pex explorations of this implementation (Pex is a tool which looks for edge cases in your code): alt text

Andreas contributed a modification, which changes the behavior when it comes to duplicate entries:

// Second if condition
else if ( tal[i] < max && tal[i] > previous) {
// ...

More Pex explorations after the modification: alt text

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this solves the problem... { 10, 9, 1 }: if you initialize previous to tal[0] and that is the maximum value in the array, then at the end of the pass both max and previous will hold the max value. You should initialize previous to a minimal value, not to the maximal, and modify the else if condition to skip when tal[i] == max. Also, in this and all of the other code snippets, why not start the loop at 1, position 0 has already been tested (or rather set)? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 11 '11 at 10:34
    
@David: I have modified my code since then, to use Integer.MIN_VALUE. It should work fine, for arrays with length 2 or higher. It may need some adjustment if you want to account for { 1, 1 } for example; I don't know what OP wants the result to be :) –  Thorarin Jan 11 '11 at 10:39
    
I have corrected the second if condition, else you would be hitting a similar problem with { MAX, MAX, ... }. The change is to be read as never update previous when the current index value is max. +1 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 11 '11 at 10:52
    
@David: it depends on what exactly how you want the algorithm to behave on duplicates. I've reverted the change, but added it as an option with more Pex explorations. –  Thorarin Jan 11 '11 at 11:06

That doesn't print out the greater number, it prints out the last number in tal greater than 5.

Assuming you actually want to print out the largest number and then the next largest number, your best bet is to sort the array using Arrays.sort, then you can access the largest and second largest elements.

Arrays.sort(tal);
System.out.println("Largest: " + tal[tal.length - 1]);
System.out.println("Second largest: " + tal[tal.length - 2]);

If you only want to deal with unique values, then you'll need to generate a list of unique values first, before sorting the array.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not going to work with {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 21, 21} :) –  Boris Pavlović Jan 11 '11 at 10:12
    
I want the number that is before max, which in this case is number 12. this is not what i am after, forget the greatest number method i did –  Karem Jan 11 '11 at 10:14
1  
@Boris - it depends what the "correct" output is - that code will give 21 as both the largest and the second largest element, which seems correct to me. –  Dominic Rodger Jan 11 '11 at 10:14
    
@Karem - Why is 12 before 21? Do you mean the the largest number that is not identical to the largest number in the array? –  Dominic Rodger Jan 11 '11 at 10:16
1  
@Stuart Golodetz: That is part of the problem of not stating all the requirements. For a small enough input, as this one, there will not be much of a difference (besides the fact that the original order is lost), and if after getting the biggest and second biggest he wants the third biggest number... well, after sorting that is O(1) so the extra cost in the beginning could be later be amortized. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 11 '11 at 10:28

You'll need to keep track of two numbers a and b. The first two numbers in the list go into a and b.

Continue through the list. Each time you encounter a number x higher than min(a,b) and not equal to max(a,b), your a and b get the values max(a,b) and x. When you reach the end, and a!=b, your second largest number is min(a,b). If a==b, then there is no second largest number.

int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21};
int a = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
int b = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
for(int x : tal) {
if(x > Math.min(a,b) && x!=Math.max(a,b)) {
        a = Math.max(a,b);
        b = x;
    }
}
if(a != b) {
    System.out.println("1st largest: "+Math.max(a,b));
    System.out.println("2nd largest: "+Math.min(a,b));
}
share|improve this answer
public class Main
{
    static int second_largest(int[] arr)
    {
        if(arr.length == 0)
        {
            return Integer.MIN_VALUE;
        }

        int maximum = arr[0];
        for(int i=1; i<arr.length; ++i)
        {
            maximum = Math.max(maximum, arr[i]);
        }

        int second = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
        for(int i=0; i<arr.length; ++i)
        {
            if(arr[i] < maximum)
            {
                second = Math.max(second, arr[i]);
            }
        }

        return second;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int[] arr = {3,8,5,8,2,3,9,12,21};
        System.out.println(second_largest(arr));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Requires two passes over the array, while it can actually be implemented in a single pass by keeping track of the two maximal elements encountered. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 11 '11 at 10:35
    
@David: That's true enough, yup. This is still linear, however. –  Stuart Golodetz Jan 11 '11 at 10:38
    
:) Passing 100 times is also linear, but slow :). Depending on the size of the input (i.e. for small inputs), an O(n log n) algorithm might be faster than a O(N) algorithm if the hidden constants are high. Not that I believe this is the case, but that is why I asked about the actual requirements and size as a comment --that has been left unanswered. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 11 '11 at 10:48
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas - Why care about two passes, why care about performance? IMHO this code is better than an one pass solution; it's very readable, the intent is clear. I suspect OP just needed working code. –  Ishtar Jan 11 '11 at 10:49
    
see my solution below. 1 pass, and very readable. :) –  Yoh Suzuki Jan 11 '11 at 10:55

You can use Arrays.sort to sort the array, and then just grab the next-biggest number from the sorted array

Arrays.sort(tal);
share|improve this answer

The simple way is to use List instead of array. Firstly, you find the maximum. Then remove it and find the maximum againg in the new list. The beneficial is that you can go further and find the next big integer and so on.

But I agree with others, sorting is better here.

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If you want the next max value to the provided value, below code would be useful

        int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21};
        int currentMax = 8; //set your current value here
        int nextMax = 0;
        Arrays.sort(tal);
        for (int i = 0; i < tal.length; i++) {
            if (tal[i] > currentMax) {
                nextMax = tal[i];
                break;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("next max  is : " + nextMax);
share|improve this answer

Well for one, currently the biggest wont be printed properly if(tal[i]>5){ should be if(tal[i]> max) to find the 2nd largest, have something like int secondMax = tal[1] swap between max & secondMax if necessary..then iterate through the rest of the array. If a number is greater than secondMax swap and so on and so forth :-)

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This will ensure that should there be two values in the array that is the maximum value (21 in this case) then it will not be returned as the second largest value as well.

int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21, 21 };
Arrays.sort(tal);
int index = tal.length - 1;
int max = tal[index];
int nextMax = max;
index -= 1;
while (nextMax == max && index >= 0) {
    nextMax = tal[index];
    index -= 1;
}
if (index < 0) System.out.println("no other value available");
else System.out.println("Next max: " + nextMax);
share|improve this answer

You're looking for the (n-1)th smallest number in a list, the algorithm to solve this problem is the selection algorithm. But selection by sorting is good enough for most cases (performance O(n log n)).


The following does not work. Thanks for reviewing my answer :-)

  // doesn't work in general!!!
  int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21};
  int max=tal[0];
  int previous = max;
  for(int i=0;i<tal.length;i++){
      if(tal[i]>max){      // <- fixed the if statement 
          previous = max;
          max=tal[i];
      }
  }
  System.out.println("Biggest: "+ max);
  System.out.println("2nd Biggest: "+ previous);

This should give 21 (Biggest) and 12 (next biggest)

(answer according to my understanding of the question ;-) )

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6  
That would work only for this example. Gives wrong answer for: {3,21,12}. –  Grzegorz Oledzki Jan 11 '11 at 10:13
    
This only works if 1,2,3 and not 3,1,2 as grzegors says –  Karem Jan 11 '11 at 10:20
    
-1 doesn't work –  dogbane Jan 11 '11 at 10:50
    
@all - yikes - you're right. Thought for a moment, that this could be a brilliant short-cut for the selection algorithm ;) –  Andreas_D Jan 11 '11 at 10:58

Option 1:

int[] tal = {3, 8, 5, 8, 2, 3, 9, 12, 21};
int nextMax = tal[0];
int max=tal[0];
for(int i=0;i<tal.length;i++){
  if(tal[i]>max){
      nextMax = max;
      max = tal[i];
  }
}
System.out.println("Biggest: "+ max);
System.out.println("Next biggest: " + nextMax);

Option 2: Run a sort function on the array, and print out the first 2 numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 doesn't work for {3,1,2} –  dogbane Jan 11 '11 at 10:51

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