Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok the topic I asked here is about "anchor" is that correct?


Ok this actually works now

<a href="http://www.mysite.com/index.php?id=363#tips1">**Development**</a> this is on the First Site

And then where the Development is: (2nd site)

<a name="#tips1">**Developer**</a>

Did I miss something here?


Ok this is this first site: http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa253/tintingerri/Test/test-4.png

Now if you can see, if you click on the "Development" it will go to the 2nd site. And in this 2nd site, this is where I listed the "Development" and "Consulting" in one page.

Now I would like that if the user click on "Consulting" it would go directly to the "Consulting" text and not to "Development" text first because they are written in one page.

So is this anchor?

share|improve this question
    
What does this have to do with the tag 'linebreaks'? Do you want to go to an external site from those links, or to have those links cause hidden information to be shown (on the same page)? –  David Thomas Jan 11 '11 at 11:01
    
@David: Sorry I don't understand your question...I was not sure what would be the title of my question because I don't know how to describe it maybe you could help me. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure I understand what you mean.

<ul>
    <li><a href="#apple">Apple</a></li>
    <li><a href="#banana">Banana</a></li>
    <li><a href="#grapes">Grapes</a></li>
</ul>
<hr />
<p id="apple">This is the Apple section.</p>
<hr />
<p id="banana">This is the Banana section.</p>
<hr />
<p id="grapes">This is the Grapes section.</p>

When you click on a link, it will take you to the section it's linked with via element IDs. The sections can be behind the <hr />.

Linking to another page is similar:

<ul>
    <li><a href="/fruit.html#apple">Apple</a></li>
    <li><a href="/fruit.html#banana">Banana</a></li>
    <li><a href="/fruit.html#grapes">Grapes</a></li>
</ul>

Is this what you meant?

[EDIT]

After clearing the issue in the comments, the solution indeed turns out to be anchors. Page one, say, index.html, will have this code:

<ul>
    <li><a href="/fruit.html#apple">Apple</a></li>
    <li><a href="/fruit.html#banana">Banana</a></li>
    <li><a href="/fruit.html#grapes">Grapes</a></li>
</ul>

While page two, say, fruit.html, will have this code:

<p id="apple">This is the Apple section.</p>
<hr />
<p id="banana">This is the Banana section.</p>
<hr />
<p id="grapes">This is the Grapes section.</p>

You don't have to use <p> tags, of course. You'll probably want to use <div> containers instead:

<div id="apple">
    <p>My apple stuff</p>
</div>
<hr />

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
@mingos: hmmm it's difficult to explain...How can I explain this simplier?... Yes I have a page where I write these points: Apple, Banana & Grapes. And they are clickable. And if you click on them, this will direct to another page, where you can see the information about Apple, Banana & Grapes. And after the info's of each, I separated it with <hr/>. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:07
    
.... So that would be: Apple - Info Apple <hr/> Banana - Info Banana <hr/> Grapes - Info Grapes </hr> ... And in my first content, if the user clicks on Grapes, it should directly to the Grapes info, without seeing the Banana & Apple Info, but you can actually scroll it. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:07
    
OK, then indeed this is what you're after. It's called anchors. You link to the other page with the #idname part (/mysite.html#apple). Then, on the mysite.html just create elements with corresponding IDs. –  mingos Jan 11 '11 at 11:09
    
@mingos: the problem is it has the same id number because these Apple, banana & grapes are all in the same content –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:11
    
Why would the sections have the same ID? You can name your sections any way you like. –  mingos Jan 11 '11 at 11:13

With an ul, very simple:

<ul>

<li><a href="#">Apple</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Banana</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Grapes</a></li>

</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
I know this. But what I would like to do is, that if the user click on those, it will go the site where Apple, Banana & Grapes are listed. The content of Apple, Banana & Grapes is written in 1 page only. So that the user will not scroll down & find the Banana & Grapes. Is this possible? –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 10:58
    
You mean ID's? Give the destination an id, like <div id="apple"> and then link to it with <a href="#apple"> –  Vincent Jan 11 '11 at 11:30
    
I did it please see my updated question above. It didn't work. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 13:25

I'm really not sure what you're asking here, but I get the impression it's along the lines of:

If someone clicks the links, how do I show information related to that link on the same page?

Which is relatively easy:

html:

<ul>
    <li><a href="#apple">Apple</a></li>
    <li><a href="#banana">Banana</a></li>
    <li><a href="#grapes">Grapes</a></li>
</ul>

<div id="apple" class="panel">
<p>Apple Stuff</p>
</div>

<div id="banana" class="panel">
<p>Banana Stuff</p>
</div>

<div id="grapes" class="panel">
<p>Grapes Stuff</p>
</div>

css:

.panel {
    display: none;
}

.panel:target {
    display: block;
}

JS Fiddle demo of the above.

share|improve this answer
    
@David: I think this is what I want. But it has the same id number that is the problem. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:09
    
btw what does this "#" mean? –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:10
    
@tintincute: an ID within an HTML document has to be unique they cannot be repeated, if you wish to repeat this, use a class instead. –  Kyle Sevenoaks Jan 11 '11 at 11:13
    
The # character indicates that the href should take you to an element with a specific ID. Like, href="#apple" will take you to an element on the page with the attribute id="apple". –  mingos Jan 11 '11 at 11:14
1  
But how does that prevent you from using the anchor? The id in the link is passed via GET, most probably to fetch the content from the database. The HTML ID is something completely different and won't clash with the id variable –  mingos Jan 11 '11 at 11:32

I think you are trying to link to another place on your page? For absolute, the following syntax is used: <a href="web address">Link text</a>.

With relative addressing, it is only necessary to use the name of the web page file you are linking to as the value in the href attribute provided that the page containing the link resides in the same folder as the page acting as the link's target. Maybe still this doesnt answer your question?

For the same page, A named anchor inside an HTML document:

<a name="useful on same page">Useful Paragraph</a>

Create a link to the "Useful Paragraph" inside the same document:

<a href="#useful on same page">Useful Paragraph</a>

If I still havent answered the question, please provide more info

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for reply. But not sure what info should I provide more. Hmmm maybe I should create some screenshot.. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:13
    
Tintincute, "#" creates the id, so that it can be referenced elsewhere on the page, ie for using the link. –  Brian Feran Jan 11 '11 at 11:14
    
I think this will do it. I will try this... –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 11:22
    
did this resolve your issue? –  Brian Feran Jan 11 '11 at 13:19
    
Yes this resolve my issue but I edited it because at first I overlook something. Check the link I got. See updated question above. –  tintincutes Jan 11 '11 at 14:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.