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I would like to write a function that will take an stl container (like set, vector or list) and then iterate over the contents and then append them to a string and give back the string.

Something like this.

// I dont know how to do this. Just using stl::container for meanings sake Not sure if such a thing exists?
template<typename T, typename Container = stl::container<T> >  
void JoinToString(const Container<T> cont, const char * delim, string &str)
{
   stringstream s;
   Container<T>::const_iterator it = cont.begin, last = cont.end();
   while(it != last)
   {
       s<<(*it);
       ++it;
       if(it == last)
           break;
       s<<delim;
   }
   str = s.str();
} 

I want something to this effect. Not sure how to write such a code.

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8 Answers 8

Create custom output iterator:

struct append_to_string_with_delim
  : std::iterator<std::output_iterator_tag, void, void, void, void>
{
  append_to_string_with_delim(std::string &ss, char const *dd) : s(ss), d(dd)
  {
  }
  template<typename T>
  append_to_string_with_delim &operator=(T const &t)
  {
    std::ostringstream o;
    o << t;
    s += o.str();
    s += d;
    return(*this);
  }
  append_to_string_with_delim &operator*()
  {
    return(*this);
  }
  append_to_string_with_delim &operator++()
  {
    return(*this);
  }
  append_to_string_with_delim const &operator++(int)
  {
    return(*this);
  }
  std::string &s;
  char const *const d;
};

and use std::copy:

std::vector<int> v;
std::string s("The v vector elements are: ");
...
copy(v.begin(), v.end(), append_to_string_with_delim(s, " "));
share|improve this answer
    
The std::copy adds the delimiter at the end, too. –  Christian Sep 27 '12 at 15:13

Another solution which does exactly what you want is boost::algorithm::join :

This algorithm joins all strings in a 'list' into one long string. Segments are concatenated by given separator.

Example of use :

#include <boost/algorithm/string/join.hpp>
#include <boost/assign/list_of.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> v = boost::assign::list_of("A")("B")("C");
    std::cout << boost::algorithm::join(v, "/") << std::endl;
}

Outputs : A/B/C

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If you really need access to the container, then this will do what you want:

template<typename Container>  
void JoinToString(const Container& cont, const char * delim, string &str)
{
  typedef typename Container::value_type T;
  ...
}

However, it's more idiomatic to use an iterator range like this:

template<typename FwdIt>  
void JoinToString(FwdIt it, FwdIt end, const char * delim, string &str)
{
  typedef typename std::iterator_traits<Container::iterator>::value_type T;
  while(it != end)
  {
     ...
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for use of value_type and use of forward iterator range. –  Antonio Pérez Jan 11 '11 at 13:15

Your solution is almost correct. Just do this:

template<typename Container >  
string JoinToString(const Container & cont, const string &delim)
{
    stringstream s;
    for (Container::const_iterator it = cont.begin(); it != cont.end(); it++ )
    {
            s<<(*it);
            if ( (it+1) != cont.end() )
                   s<<delim;
    }
    return s.str();
} 

Better function would be this:

template<typename FwdIt>  
string JoinToString(FwdIt from, FwdIt to, const string &delim)
{
    stringstream s;
    for (; from != to; from++ )
    {
        s<<(*from);
        if ( (from+1) != to )
            s<<delim;
    }
    return s.str();
}

Using this decide from and to using which to join the elements!

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Tried the first solution but does not compile. I am trying on Linux. It says expected ';' before it and 'it' was not declared in this scope –  AMM Jan 11 '11 at 14:28
    
@AMM : I think, the code you're trying to compile is NOT exactly same as I've written here. please check it out if it's same, line by line, semi-colon by semi-colon! –  Nawaz Jan 11 '11 at 15:16

This is a working example,

template<typename T>  
std::string JoinToString(const T& cont, const char* delim, std::string &str)
{
   std::stringstream s;
   T::const_iterator it= cont.begin();
   T::const_iterator last= cont.end();
   while(it != last)
   {
      s << (*it);
      ++it;
      s << delim;
      if (it == last)
         break;
   }
   return s.str() + str;
} 

int main()
{
   std::string s("String! ");
   std::vector<std::string> v(1, "String!, String!");
   std::cout << JoinToString(v, ", ", s) << "\n";

   std::list<std::string> l(1, "String!, String!");
   std::cout << JoinToString(l, ", ", s);
}

There are a few things worth noting though. You could use template<template<class> class T, although it might cause problems, depending on the amount of template arguments the container has.

I would like to note (for future reference), if you want to plug in a type into a class template, e.g. a std::string as a template argument into a std::vector the safest solution is,

template<class T>
struct something
{
   typedef typename boost::mpl::apply<T, std::string>::type type;
};
something<std::vector<boost::mpl::placeholders::_1>>::type;  

The reason this is safer, than using a template<template<class> class T, is that it will allow more customisation from the user side and will work on class templates with any amount of arguments/default arguments.

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The STL style is to pass in begin and end iterators to any algorithm, not the container itself: this keeps things general, and allows the use of native vectors with pointers. General C++ style considerations would also suggest returning a std::string instead of using a reference parameter.

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You need to decide what you want. You can either pass a type or a template. Not both. In the code you posted you declare Container to a be type, but use it as a template.

template<typename T, typename Container = vector<T> > 
void test() { Container x; };

template<typename T, template <typename> class Container = vector > 
void test() { Container<T> x; } 
share|improve this answer
    
Passing the template is not trivial. For starters your code will fail in all standard compilers, as the std::vector container takes at least two type arguments. Then the problem is that the standard allows implementations to add additional parameters as long as they are defaulted, that is, in a perfectly conforming implementation, std::vector could have 3, 4, 5... arguments. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 11 '11 at 13:06
    
Template template parameters are difficult to use and maintain and, for various reasons including the one David points out, they don't add much. I've never felt the need to reach for one in production code. –  Joe Gauterin Jan 11 '11 at 13:43

Have a look at remove char from stringstream and append some data

Such a function does not exist.

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