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I have implemented an algorithm that will generate unique names for files that will save on hard drive. Im appending DateTime,Hours,Minutes,Second and Milliseconds but still it generates duplicate name of files because im uploading multiple files at a time. What is the best solution to generate unique names for files to be stored on hard drive so no 2 files are same?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 121 down vote accepted

If readability doesn't matter, use GUIDs.

E.g.

var myUniqueFileName = string.Format(@"{0}.txt", Guid.NewGuid());

In my programs, I sometimes try e.g. 10 times to generate a readable name ("Image1.png".."Image10.png") and if that fails, I fall back to GUIDs.

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9  
+1 this is what I was about to suggest. –  James Jan 11 '11 at 13:16
7  
Oops, "-1"? Was I wrong with my answer? –  Uwe Keim Jan 11 '11 at 14:38

Use

Path.GetTempFileName()

or use new GUID().

Path.GetTempFilename() on MSDN.

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Here is the link to the MSDN doc: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  epotter Jan 11 '11 at 13:56
3  
Note though, that GetTempFileName() might throw an exception if you create many such files without deleting them. –  Joey Jan 11 '11 at 18:14
11  
"The GetTempFileName method will raise an IOException if it is used to create more than 65535 files without deleting previous temporary files." says the MSDN article. –  çağdaş Jan 13 '11 at 6:37
    
ohh i c that is a good point. –  KBBWrite Jan 13 '11 at 7:01
System.IO.Path.GetRandomFileName()

Path.GetRandomFileName() on MSDN.

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Here is the link to the MSDN doc: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  epotter Jan 11 '11 at 13:57
    
Just keep in mind, how the seeding for this method works. Good seed yields better randomness. –  RyBolt Jan 11 '11 at 15:23
7  
@RyBolt: Since you don't have to seed yourself there is pretty much nothing you have to keep in mind for using that method. And I'd expect the vast majority of developers to have no clue about how to build secure cryptographic systems. –  Joey Jan 11 '11 at 18:12

If the readability of the file name isn't important, then the GUID, as suggested by many will do. However, I find that looking into a directory with 1000 GUID file names is very daunting to sort through. So I usually use a combination of a static string which gives the file name some context information, a timestamp, and GUID.

For example:

public string GenerateFileName(string context)
{
    return context + "_" + DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyyMMddHHmmssfff") + "_" + Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N");
}

filename1 = GenerateFileName("MeasurementData");
filename2 = GenerateFileName("Image");

This way, when I sort by filename, it will automatically group the files by the context string and sort by timestamp.

Note that the filename limit in windows is 255 characters.

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1  
this looks a better solution –  Chang Jan 14 '11 at 7:26
1  
+1 For the suggestion to include useful information combined with a GUID. - An aside to take with a grain of salt: including the date and time in a file name is kind of redundant when you can just Right Click > Sort By > Date. –  Timothy Shields Jun 9 '13 at 3:39
    
The time becomes useful if you're storing a bunch of files with different contexts in the same directory. Of course, the file name generation should be adjusted based on your specific needs. –  Mas Jun 10 '13 at 12:27
    
Should be Guid.NewGuid().ToString();. Missing parenthesis. +1 otherwise –  L. Wartel Jan 28 at 11:24

Here's an algorithm that returns a unique readable filename based on the original supplied. If the original file exists, it incrementally tries to append an index to the filename until it finds one that doesn't exist. It uses a HashSet to check for file existence so it's pretty quick (a few hundred filenames per second) and it's thread safe.

For example, if you pass it test.txt, it will attempt to create files in this order:

test.txt
test (2).txt
test (3).txt

etc. You can specify the maximum attempts or just leave it at the default.

Here's a complete example:

class Program
{
    static FileStream CreateFileWithUniqueName(string folder, string fileName, 
        int maxAttempts = 1024)
    {
        // get filename base and extension
        var fileBase = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileName);
        var ext = Path.GetExtension(fileName);
        // build hash set of filenames for performance
        var files = new HashSet<string>(Directory.GetFiles(folder));

        for (var index = 0; index < maxAttempts; index++)
        {
            // first try with the original filename, else try incrementally adding an index
            var name = (index == 0)
                ? fileName
                : String.Format("{0} ({1}){2}", fileBase, index, ext);

            // check if exists
            var fullPath = Path.Combine(folder, name);
            if(files.Contains(fullPath))
                continue;

            // try to open the stream
            try
            {
                return new FileStream(fullPath, FileMode.CreateNew, FileAccess.Write);
            }
            catch (DirectoryNotFoundException) { throw; }
            catch (DriveNotFoundException) { throw; }
            catch (IOException) { } // ignore this and try the next filename
        }

        throw new Exception("Could not create unique filename in " + maxAttempts + " attempts");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (var i = 0; i < 500; i++)
        {
            using (var stream = CreateFileWithUniqueName(@"c:\temp\", "test.txt"))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Created \"" + stream.Name + "\"");
            }
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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  1. Create your timestamped filename following your normal process
  2. Check to see if filename exists
  3. False - save file
  4. True - Append additional character to file, perhaps a counter
  5. Go to step 2
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8  
This algorithm is vunerable to concurrency –  Jader Dias Jan 11 '11 at 16:14
    
See my answer for an algorithm that's thread safe. –  Mike Chamberlain Dec 4 '12 at 5:24

I have been using the following code and its working fine. I hope this might help you.

I begin with a unique file name using a timestamp -

"context_" + DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyyMMddHHmmssffff")

C# code -

public static string CreateUniqueFile(string logFilePath, string logFileName, string fileExt)
    {
        try
        {
            int fileNumber = 1;

            //prefix with . if not already provided
            fileExt = (!fileExt.StartsWith(".")) ? "." + fileExt : fileExt;

            //Generate new name
            while (File.Exists(Path.Combine(logFilePath, logFileName + "-" + fileNumber.ToString() + fileExt)))
                fileNumber++;

            //Create empty file, retry until one is created
            while (!CreateNewLogfile(logFilePath, logFileName + "-" + fileNumber.ToString() + fileExt))
                fileNumber++;

            return logFileName + "-" + fileNumber.ToString() + fileExt;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

    private static bool CreateNewLogfile(string logFilePath, string logFile)
    {
        try
        {
            FileStream fs = new FileStream(Path.Combine(logFilePath, logFile), FileMode.CreateNew);
            fs.Close();
            return true;
        }
        catch (IOException)   //File exists, can not create new
        {
            return false;
        }
        catch (Exception)     //Exception occured
        {
            throw;
        }
    }
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Do you need the date time stamp in the filename?

You could make the filename a GUID.

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@downvoter Any reason for the down vote? A GUID for a filename seems to be a popular answer on this question. –  hipplar Jan 11 '11 at 16:12
    
It's a repeated answer, and I don't have enough reputation to downvote –  Jader Dias Jan 11 '11 at 16:14
    
@XMLforDummies my answer was one of the first. It may not seem like it now because it just show the hours by now. It's a repeated answer because it's probably the correct answer. –  hipplar Jan 11 '11 at 16:19

How about using Guid.NewGuid() to create a GUID and use that as the filename (or part of the filename together with your time stamp if you like).

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I've written a simple recursive function that generates file names like Windows does, by appending a sequence number prior to the file extension.

Given a desired file path of C:\MyDir\MyFile.txt, and the file already exists, it returns a final file path of C:\MyDir\MyFile_1.txt.

It is called like this:

var desiredPath = @"C:\MyDir\MyFile.txt";
var finalPath = UniqueFileName(desiredPath);

private static string UniqueFileName(string path, int count = 0)
{
    if (count == 0)
    {
        if (!File.Exists(path))
        {
            return path;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        var candidatePath = string.Format(
            @"{0}\{1}_{2}{3}",
            Path.GetDirectoryName(path),
            Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(path),
            count,
            Path.GetExtension(path));

        if (!File.Exists(candidatePath))
        {
            return candidatePath;
        }
    }

    count++;
    return UniqueFileName(path, count);
}
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I would love to hear why this was downvoted. –  Chris Schiffhauer Mar 11 at 19:33

If you would like to have the datetime,hours,minutes etc..you can use a static variable. Append the value of this variable to the filename. You can start the counter with 0 and increment when you have created a file. This way the filename will surely be unique since you have seconds also in the file.

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I usually do something along these lines:

  • start with a stem file name (work.dat1 for instance)
  • try to create it with CreateNew
  • if that works, you've got the file, otherwise...
  • mix the current date/time into the filename (work.2011-01-15T112357.dat for instance)
  • try to create the file
  • if that worked, you've got the file, otherwise...
  • Mix a monotonic counter into the filename (work.2011-01-15T112357.0001.dat for instance. (I dislike GUIDs. I prefer order/predictability.)
  • try to create the file. Keep ticking up the counter and retrying until a file gets created for you.

Here's a sample class:

static class DirectoryInfoHelpers
{
    public static FileStream CreateFileWithUniqueName( this DirectoryInfo dir , string rootName )
    {
        FileStream fs = dir.TryCreateFile( rootName ) ; // try the simple name first

        // if that didn't work, try mixing in the date/time
        if ( fs == null )
        {
            string date = DateTime.Now.ToString( "yyyy-MM-ddTHHmmss" ) ;
            string stem = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(rootName) ;
            string ext  = Path.GetExtension(rootName) ?? ".dat" ;

            ext = ext.Substring(1);

            string fn = string.Format( "{0}.{1}.{2}" , stem , date , ext ) ;
            fs = dir.TryCreateFile( fn ) ;

            // if mixing in the date/time didn't work, try a sequential search
            if ( fs == null )
            {
                int seq = 0 ;
                do
                {
                    fn = string.Format( "{0}.{1}.{2:0000}.{3}" , stem , date , ++seq , ext ) ;
                    fs = dir.TryCreateFile( fn ) ;
                } while ( fs == null ) ;
            }

        }

        return fs ;
    }

    private static FileStream TryCreateFile(this DirectoryInfo dir , string fileName )
    {
        FileStream fs = null ;
        try
        {
            string fqn = Path.Combine( dir.FullName , fileName ) ;

            fs = new FileStream( fqn , FileMode.CreateNew , FileAccess.ReadWrite , FileShare.None ) ;
        }
        catch ( Exception )
        {
            fs = null ;
        }
        return fs ;
    }

}

You might want to tweak the algorithm (always use all the possible components to the file name for instance). Depends on the context -- If I was creating log files for instance, that I might want to rotate out of existence, you'd want them all to share the same pattern to the name.

The code isn't perfect (no checks on the data passed in for instance). And the algorithm's not perfect (if you fill up the hard drive or encounter permissions, actual I/O errors or other file system errors, for instance, this will hang, as it stands, in an infinite loop).

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I ends up concatenating GUID with Day Month Year Second Millisecond string and i think this solution is quite good in my scenario

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you can use Random.Next() also to generate a random number. you can see the MSDN link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9b3ta19y.aspx

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I would not recommend this, since it doesn't need to be random. It needs to be unique. –  Max Feb 21 at 8:36

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