Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My Yacc source is in pos.yacc and my Lex source is in pos1.lex, as shown.

pos1.lex

%{
#include "y.tab.h"

int yylval;
%}
DIGIT [0-9]+
%%
{DIGIT} {yylval=atoi(yytext);return DIGIT;}
[\n ] {}
. {return *yytext;}
%%

pos.yacc

%token DIGIT
%%
s:e {printf("%d\n",$1);}
e:DIGIT {$$=$1;}
|e e "+" {$$=$1+$2;}
|e e "*" {$$=$1*$2;}
|e e "-" {$$=$1-$2;}
|e e "/" {$$=$1/$2;}
;
%%
main() {
  yyparse();
}
yyerror() {
  printf("Error");
}

Compilation errors

While compiling I am getting errors like:

malathy@malathy:~$ cc lex.yy.c  y.tab.c -ly -ll
pos.y: In function ‘yyerror’:
pos.y:16: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’
pos.y: In function ‘yyparse’:
pos.y:4: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’

  • What causes those errors?
  • How am I supposed to compile Lex and Yacc source code?
share|improve this question
3  
Please use proper formatting... –  Tobiask Jan 11 '11 at 13:42
6  
... and turn off caps lock. –  Jon Skeet Jan 11 '11 at 13:43
    
...AND DON'T SHOUT. It's considered rude. –  Péter Török Jan 11 '11 at 13:44
    
... and don't tag a question "java" when it's about lex/yacc. –  gustafc Jan 11 '11 at 13:45
3  
What did you do? People put effort into formatting your question correctly... –  Felix Kling Jan 11 '11 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

printf() is defined in stdio.h so just include it above y.tab.h in pos1.lex:

%{
#include <stdio.h>
/* Add  ^^^^^^^^^^^ this line */
#include "y.tab.h"

  int yylval;
%}
DIGIT [0-9]+
%%
{DIGIT} {yylval=atoi(yytext);return DIGIT;}
[\n ] {}
. {return *yytext;}
%%
share|improve this answer

You have the direct answer to your question from trojanfoe - you need to include <stdio.h> to declare the function printf(). This is true in any source code presented to the C compiler.

However, you should also note that the conventional suffix for Yacc source is .y (rather than .yacc), and for Lex source is .l (rather than .lex). In particular, using those sufffixes means that make will know what to do with your source, rather than having to code the compilation rules by hand.


Given files lex.l and yacc.y, make compiles them to object code using:

$ make lex.o yacc.o
rm -f lex.c 
lex  -t lex.l > lex.c
cc -O -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -c -o lex.o lex.c
yacc  yacc.y 
mv -f y.tab.c yacc.c
cc -O -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -c -o yacc.o yacc.c
rm lex.c yacc.c
$

This is in a directory with a makefile that sets CFLAGS = -O -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra. (This was on MacOS X 10.6.6.) You will sometimes see other similar rules used; in particular, lex generates a file lex.yy.c by default (at least on MacOS X), and you'll often see a rule such as:

lex lex.l
mv lex.yy.c lex.c
cc -O -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -c -o lex.o lex.c

Or even:

lex lex.l
cc -O -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -c -o lex.o lex.yy.c

The alternatives are legion; use make and it gets it right.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry... my yacc file is infix.y and lex file name is in.l...can any one tell me command for these to run and compile... –  nisha Jan 11 '11 at 14:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.