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Crap. I found the problem. Never mind. When the item was removed, it was supposed to be replaced with another item, but before the replacing could happen, an event was triggered that removed the wrong item since the replacing had not yet taken place.

Both ways, the assertions fail:

var item4 = listBox.Items[4];
var item5 = listBox.Items[5];

listBox.Items.Remove(item5);

Debug.Assert(listBox.Items.Contains(item4), "item4 not found");
Debug.Assert(!listBox.Items.Contains(item5), "item5 still found");

And:

var item4 = listBox.Items[4];
var item5 = listBox.Items[5];

listBox.Items.RemoveAt(5);

Debug.Assert(listBox.Items.Contains(item4), "item4 not found");
Debug.Assert(!listBox.Items.Contains(item5), "item5 still found");

ListBox items are custom classes. ListBox is owner drawn.

The assertion item4 != item5 passes.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

ListBox items are custom classes.

If you've overriden GetHashCode and Equals method then Remove might find that item4 and item5 are indeed the same and thus remove item4 instead of item5 because that's the first one it finds.

Try doing it twice. If both items are removed then that's most likely the case. Also try asserting item4.Equals(item5) instead of item4 == item5.

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+1, that's probably what's happening. And the != operator is probably not overloaded, so it uses reference equality, which explains why item4 != item5 –  Thomas Levesque Jan 11 '11 at 14:46
    
The passing assertion item4 != item5 would seem to refute this. I had overridden neither method. I just overrode both methods to check for equality and return hash codes based on a unique property of the item, but the behavior remains unchanged. –  Instance Hunter Jan 11 '11 at 14:47
    
Was already trying both assertions, left out of question for simplicity. Both assertions still pass. Oddly, however, I can call Remove(item5) again to remove the correct item5, even though the former assertions still hold as well as item4.GetHashCode() != item5.GetHashCode(). –  Instance Hunter Jan 11 '11 at 14:49
    
That's weird. The ListBox is considering item4 and item5 are the same... and as far as I know that's because the Equal method determines both are the same element (Equals, not == operator). Could you post your override of Equal method? –  Jorge Córdoba Jan 11 '11 at 14:55
    
See question.... sigh. I'll give you credit since trying to trace through your suggestions led to the answer. –  Instance Hunter Jan 11 '11 at 14:59

When you remove an item from a listbox the listbox is reindexed. Item [6] becomes item [5].

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.listbox.objectcollection.remove(VS.71).aspx

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