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Challenge

Compactify a long list of numbers by replacing consecutive runs with ranges.

Example

Input

1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15
The input is guaranteed to be in ascending order and will not contain duplicates.

Output

1 - 4, 7, 8, 10, 12 - 15
Note that ranges of two numbers should be left as is. (7, 8; not 7 - 8)

Rules

You can accept a sorted list of integers (or equivalent datatype) as a method parameter, from the commandline, or from standard in. (pick whichever option results in shorter code)
You can output a list of strings by printing them, or by returning either a single string or set of strings.

Reference Implementation

(C#)

IEnumerable<string> Sample(IList<int> input) {
    for (int i = 0; i < input.Count; ) {
        var start = input[i];
        int size = 1;
        while (++i < input.Count && input[i] == start + size)
            size++;

        if (size == 1)
            yield return start.ToString();
        else if (size == 2) {
            yield return start.ToString();
            yield return (start + 1).ToString();
        } else if (size > 2)
            yield return start + " - " + (start + size - 1);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
CW for questions was removed a while ago. I also believe that programmers is supposed to be where code golf should go (at least according to the FAQ and Jeffs' post about it). –  Oded Jan 11 '11 at 15:53
3  
@Oded, @SLaks, this is the appropriate place for code golf as of now. –  jjnguy Jan 11 '11 at 16:30
2  
CW requests should be done by flags, not by hints above in the question. I've done it for you. –  BalusC Jan 11 '11 at 16:49
3  
Like these Code Golf and other puzzles? Commit to the Code Golf & Programming Puzzles area51 proposal. –  marcog Jan 11 '11 at 21:46
3  
Duplicate problem, and a spoiler - has been published already in codegolf.com/home-on-the-range . Please do not post solutions here, so that solutions won't be used to inflate rankings on codegolf.com –  Nas Banov Jan 12 '11 at 4:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Python, 83 characters

def f(l,a=2):
 for x in l:
  b,a=a,(x+1in l)*(x-1in l)
  if a<1:print',- '[b],`x`,

Demo:

>>> l=[1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15]
>>> f(l)
  1 - 4 , 7 , 8 , 10 , 12 - 15
share|improve this answer
    
copy and pasting your first snippet acutally it's more than 83 chars –  dynamic Mar 24 '11 at 19:34
    
?? How you count characters? I did count end of lines and whitespaces... –  Jules Olléon Mar 25 '11 at 2:36
    
@yes: You're counting line breaks as two characters. –  SLaks Apr 7 '11 at 15:14
    
Very nice, but why the backticks around x? –  Tomasz Gandor Jan 15 at 12:00
    
@TomaszGandor: honestly, I'm not sure (and this is pretty old!). Seems to work fine without backticks, yes... –  Jules Olléon Jan 16 at 0:51

Python, 98 characters

def f(a):
 for x in a:
  if x-1not in a or x+1not in a:print x,"-"if x+1in a and x+2in a else",",

Python - 86 characters

This one doesn't include an extra ',' at the end

f=lambda a:''.join(`x`+",-"[(x+1in a)&x+2in a]for x in a if(x-1in a)&(x+1in a)^1)[:-1]
share|improve this answer
    
I like that approach –  SLaks Jan 11 '11 at 19:35
    
if x-1not in a or x+1not in a:print x,",-"[x+1in a and x+2in a], is shorter –  gnibbler Jan 12 '11 at 2:52
    
I don't know python very well, but doesn't this print one extra "," in the end? –  Timo Jan 12 '11 at 3:08
    
@Timo, yeah it's not clear if that's permitted or not –  gnibbler Jan 12 '11 at 3:30

Ruby, 165 characters

a=[]
def o(a)print "#{@s}#{a[0]}#{"#{a.size<3?',':' -'} #{a[-1]}"if a.size>1}";@s=', 'end
ARGV[0].split(', ').each{|n|if a[0]&&a[-1].succ!=n;o(a);a=[]end;a<<n;};o(a)
share|improve this answer

C++, 166 characters

#define o std::cout
void f(std::vector<int> v){for(int i=0,b=0,z=v.size();i<z;)i==z-1||v[i+1]>v[i]+1?b?o<<", ":o,(i-b?o<<v[b]<<(i-b>1?" - ":", "):o)<<v[i],b=++i:++i;}

Don't you all just love abusing the ?: operator? ;)

More readable version:

#define o std::cout
void f(std::vector<int> v){
    for(int i=0,b=0,z=v.size();i<z;)
        i==z-1||v[i+1]>v[i]+1 ?
            b?o<<", ":o,
            (i-b?o<<v[b]<<(i-b>1?" - ":", "):o)<<v[i],
            b=++i
        :++i;
}
share|improve this answer

Common Lisp, 442/206 chars

(defun d (l)
  (if l
      (let ((f (car l))
        (r (d (cdr l))))
      (if r
          (if (= (+ f 1) (caar r))
          (push `(,f ,(cadar r)) (cdr r))
          (push `(,f ,f) r))
          `((,f ,f))
          ))
      nil))

(defun p (l)
  (mapc #'(lambda (x)
          (if (= (car x) (cadr x))
          (format t "~a " (car x))
          (if (= (+ 1 (car x)) (cadr x))
              (format t "~a ~a " (car x) (cadr x))
              (format t "~a-~a " (car x) (cadr x)))))
      (d l)))

The "d" function rewrites the input list into a canonical form. For fun I did this entirely recursively. The "p" function formats the output to the equivalent of the reference implementation.

share|improve this answer

F#, 188 chars

let r(x::s)=
 let f=printf
 let p x=function|1->f"%A "x|2->f"%A %A "x (x+1)|n->f"%A-%A "x (x+n-1)
 let rec l x n=function|y::s when y=x+n->l x (n+1)s|y::s->p x n;l y 1 s|[]->p x n
 l x 1 s

More readable:

let range (x::xs) =
  let f = printf
  let print x = function
    | 1 -> f "%A " x
    | 2 -> f "%A %A " x (x+1)
    | n -> f "%A-%A " x (x+n-1)
  let rec loop x n = function
    | y::ys when y=x+n ->
        loop x (n+1) ys
    | y::ys ->
        print x n
        loop y 1 ys
    | [] ->
        print x n
  loop x 1 xs
share|improve this answer

Ruby : 123 characters

def y(n) t=[];r=[];n.each_with_index do |x,i| t<<x;if(x.succ!=n[i+1]);r=((t.size>2)?r<<t[0]<<-t[-1]:r+t);t=[];end;end;r;end

More Readable

def y(n) 
t=[];r=[];
n.each_with_index do |x,i|
 t << x
 if (x.succ != n[i+1])
    r = ((t.size > 2) ? r << t[0] << -t[-1] : r+t)  
    t=[]
 end
 end
 r
end

And execute like

 > n=[1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15]
 > y n
 => [1, -4, 7, 8, 10, 12, -15]
share|improve this answer

PHP 95 chars

(actually it's the second language after python)

Given $a=array(numbers);

Algos:

for($i=0;$i<count($a);$i++){$c=$i;while($a[$i+2]==$a[$i]+2)$i++;echo $a[$c],$i-$c>1?'-':',';}
share|improve this answer
    
actually this throws notices about undefined offsets... but hey, the rules don't say stderr must be clean... but the output format is not quite right. edit: also it doesn't account for where the input comes from so your 95 chars aren't valid imho –  luxifer Sep 15 '11 at 6:18
    
@luxifer: i don't quite remeber of this problem, i will try my script again and i will update –  dynamic Sep 15 '11 at 8:23

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