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I try to set up a tableView. I use standard cells for all sections' rows except in the last section (containing one row). Thus, I would also like to use the standard layout for all those sections except that special one.

A short example is the following, my "special" cell is in section 3 (there is only one row):

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    if (section == 3)
        return 5;
    return **????**;
}

At ??? I would like to return the width calculated from UITableView (just as if I did not implement the method).

[super self:tableView heightForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section];

does not work. I know I can access

[tableView setionHeaderHeight]

which is by default 10 and obviously does not take into account that I have section headings for the other sections, which will require additional space. I tried that, but it will then get the sections too close (see screenshot):

(Note: the section I am interested in is the one which does not look like a cell: the one with the dates (invisible background)). alt text

So, the easiest thing would be to hand over the layout to the standard implementation which is perfect - except for section3.

What are my options?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You do not have a super implementation tableView:heightForHeaderInSection: since you are not subclassing any abstract base implementation for UITableViewDelegate. The table view is instead decided if the default height should be used by inspecting your delegate implementation to see if the method is available.

It is a quite a huge concept to wrap your head around, especially if coming from Java or C#. Methods in Objective-C protocols can be optional, and their absence means use default.

Your method should probably be implemented as:

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    if (section == 3) {
       return 5;
    } else {
       return 36;
    }
 }

The default height for grouped and plain tableviews are different (22points for plain). The default values are not exposed by UITableView, not even as private methods. File bug at http://bugreport.apple.com to make this a public constant.

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... as I wrote: that leads to the layout as in the picture above. The taleView.sectionHeaderHeight does not take into account the space needed for section headings. taleView.sectionHeaderHeight is 10, which is definitely not enough. From experimenting, I'd say I need about 35. So, there must be some code somewhere which calculates the correct layout when I don't implement the method. And I'd like to call that explicitely. –  Axel Jan 11 '11 at 18:06
    
Updated the answer with the correct constant. –  PeyloW Jan 11 '11 at 18:34
    
From even more experimenting, the values for setionHeaderHeight (with sectionHeading) are something like 45 for section 0 and about 35 for all the others. –  Axel Jan 12 '11 at 7:49

Just in case: there is a new constant introduced in iOS 5, called UITableViewAutomaticDimension. As the documentation says, you should return it from your delegate method when you want UITableView to use a default value.

So, the code for your case would be:

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    if (section == 3) {
       return 5;
    } else {
       return UITableViewAutomaticDimension;
    }
}
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You seem a bit confused about heightForHeaderInSection - it returns the height of a table section header (this is the "title" of a table section), not a row. iOS calls this method to ask for the height of just a single section header, irrespective of any other section headers there might be.

If you want to use the default, just return [tableView sectionHeaderHeight] for any section other than 3 - you don't need to "take into account that [you] have other section headers", as it's asking for the height of the header for section alone. It will ask again for the heights of others (and compute the relative positions with of rows and other sections automatically).

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I made the description clearer. I'm sure I am not confused. Maybe the description was confusing... –  Axel Jan 11 '11 at 17:07
    
If I return the default value, the whole layout is wrong - the section headers obviously do not take the section headings into account. –  Axel Jan 11 '11 at 17:08
    
Define 'the whole layout is wrong'. I've no idea what you mean by "the section headers obviously do not take section headings into account", as by definition, they are the section headings. Are you returning custom header views via the delegate method tableView:viewForHeaderInSection:? If so, you could just return the height of the appropriate view. –  Adam Wright Jan 11 '11 at 17:15
    
added a screenshot. Here, the heightForHeaderSection always returns 10. Note: the section I am interested in is the one with the dates (invisible background). –  Axel Jan 11 '11 at 17:48

After overriding heightForHeaderInSection and doing a side-by-side comparison, the height for the header in the first row is larger than the rest. This isn't pixel perfect, but it's very close:

- (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    if (section == 0 ) {
        return 46.0;
    } else if (section == myCustomRow) {
        return 12345.0; // custom height
    } else {
        return 36.0;
    }
}
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