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Is it possible to create a generic object from a reflected type in C# (.Net 2.0)?

void foobar(Type t){
    IList<t> newList = new List<t>(); //this doesn't work
    //...
}

The Type, t, is not known until runtime.

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marked as duplicate by usr May 30 '14 at 17:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What do you expect to do with a list you don't know the type of at compile-time? –  dtb Jan 11 '11 at 18:30
1  
Are you able to write this as a generic function, as in void foobar<T>() { IList<T> newList = new List<T>(); } –  Juliet Jan 11 '11 at 18:31
    
I've a feeling this might be a code smell, as a result of tackling a larger problem in a bad way. –  sprocketonline Jan 11 '11 at 18:36
    
I posted a separate question regarding the larger problem at hand: stackoverflow.com/questions/4661734/… –  sprocketonline Jan 11 '11 at 19:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Try this:

void foobar(Type t)
{
    var listType = typeof(List<>);
    var constructedListType = listType.MakeGenericType(t);

    var instance = Activator.CreateInstance(constructedListType);
}

Now what to do with instance? Since you don't know the type of your list's contents, probably the best thing you could do would be to cast instance as an IList so that you could have something other than just an object:

// Now you have a list - it isn't strongly typed but at least you
// can work with it and use it to some degree.
var instance = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(constructedListType);
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2  
+1 for typeof(List<>), I hadn't seen this before. –  Wesley Wiser Jan 11 '11 at 18:35
    
does var exist in .Net framework 2.0?! –  sprocketonline Jan 11 '11 at 19:30
    
@sprocketonline: var is a C# 3 feature so if you are using C# 2 you will need to declare your variables explicitly. –  Andrew Hare Jan 11 '11 at 19:52

You can use MakeGenericType for such operations.

For documentation, see here and here.

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static void Main(string[] args)
{
  IList list = foobar(typeof(string));
  list.Add("foo");
  list.Add("bar");
  foreach (string s in list)
    Console.WriteLine(s);
  Console.ReadKey();
}

private static IList foobar(Type t)
{
  var listType = typeof(List<>);
  var constructedListType = listType.MakeGenericType(t);
  var instance = Activator.CreateInstance(constructedListType);
  return (IList)instance;
}
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+1 for remember the good old non generic supported interfaces :) –  leppie Jan 11 '11 at 18:49

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