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I am in need of determining whether an IQueryable Method returns with Data, or "Empty" when applying it to a DataSource of a RadGrid like so:

RadGrid.DataSource = Method(x);

        if (Method(x) == yyy)
        {
            button.Enabled = true;
        }
        else
        {
            button.Enabled = false;
        }

I have tried using "null" in place of the "yyy" but with no success. When stepping through the code, the IQueryable Method returns as "Empty" but I am unsure of how to verify that using an If statement.

What does an IQueryable Method return as if it returns as Empty, and how can I verify that using an If Statement?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use Any() to check to see if there are any elements in the IQueryable:

RadGrid.DataSource = Method(x);

if (Method(x).Any())
{
    button.Enabled = true;
}
else
{
    button.Enabled = false;
}

(Or, alternatively, the shorter version:)

button.Enabled = Method(x).Any();
share|improve this answer
    
Are there any extra references I will need to use .Any()? As I am getting errors when trying to compile this. –  Lando Jan 11 '11 at 20:43
1  
@Lando: Typically, if you're using IQueryable already, it should "just work" - it's an extension method on Queryable.Any (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534338.aspx) - Make sure to have using System.Linq; at the top of your file, as well as a reference to System.Core.dll. –  Reed Copsey Jan 11 '11 at 20:50
    
This is what I had figured also. As I use LINQ on almost all of my current pages, the System.Linq; reference already exists at the top of the page. I am accessing my Methods through a separate .dll I have previously created... that shouldn't make any differences should it? –  Lando Jan 11 '11 at 20:58
    
@Lando: No - what's the exact error you're seeing? (Compile time or runtime? message?) –  Reed Copsey Jan 11 '11 at 20:59
    
The Error is: Error 95 'System.Linq.IQueryable' does not contain a definition for 'Any' and no extension method 'Any' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Linq.IQueryable' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) --- Nothing out of the ordinary, but confusing as to why it's not recognizing the Reference. –  Lando Jan 11 '11 at 21:11

You want to use IQueryable.Any.

bool empty = !queryable.Any();
if(empty) {
    // something
}
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Try something like

RadGrid.DataSource = Method(x);            
 if (RadGrid.DataSource as MyObject == null)          
 {              
      button.Enabled = true;          
 }          
 else          
 {              
       button.Enabled = false;          
 }  
share|improve this answer

Try this:

if (Method(x) == Enumerable.Empty<YourType>())
{
    // Your code
}

Since Enumerable.Empty<TResult>() is cached for TResult it will hold the same reference as the empty sequence reterned from Method and therefore will be equatable.

If you are unsure whether or not this will work, please run this example:

using System;
using System.Linq;

class Example
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var first = Enumerable.Empty<Example>();
        var second = Enumerable.Empty<Example>();

        Console.WriteLine(object.ReferenceEquals(first, second));
    }
}
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I think that's a reference comparison and so fails, in general. –  jason Jan 11 '11 at 20:30
    
-1 This will perform a reference comparison. It should be obvious why this won't work in almost every case. It will only work if the method returns Enumerable.Empty<T>() -- and in most cases it will be returning some other enumerable that has no elements. –  cdhowie Jan 11 '11 at 20:30
    
Here is my counter-example: public static IEnumerable<T> Empty<T>() { yield break; } public static bool Test() { return Empty<object>() == Enumerable.Empty<object>(); }. Test() will return false, as it should. This will only work if the method being called returns Enumerable.Empty<T>() -- not all empty enumerables are equivalent. Using Enumerable.Any<T>() is a much better approach. –  cdhowie Jan 14 '11 at 4:59

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