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The reason I'm asking is because I'm getting NullPointerException. I now this is very easy but I'm pretty new programming and find this a bit confusing. So say I have initialized an object in a class and want to access that same object from another class.

Like now for instance I'm working on a small Chess game, in my model Game class I have an instance of Board, an object. Board, in turn, has an array of Squares. Square[][].

Game has board, board has Square[][].

Now if I want to access the Square[][] through the object board (in Game) of type Board. Do I just declare a variable with the same name and type or do I have to initialize it again?

Board board OR Board board = new Board();

Note, I have already initialized board in the class Game so if I do it again, won't they be two totally different Board objects?

The class that refers to "board":

public class View extends JFrame {

Board      board;
JFrame     gameWindow   = new JFrame("Chess");
JPanel     gamePanel    = new JPanel();
JPanel[][] boardPanel   = new JPanel[8][8];
JMenuBar   gameMenu     = new JMenuBar();
JButton    newGame      = new JButton("New game");
JButton    pauseGame    = new JButton("Pause");
JButton    actionLog    = new JButton("Action log");

View(){
    gameWindow.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    gameWindow.setSize(400, 400);
    gameWindow.getContentPane().add(gamePanel);
    gameWindow.setVisible(true);
    gamePanel.setVisible(true);
    gameMenu.add(newGame);
    gameMenu.add(pauseGame);
    gameMenu.add(actionLog);
    for(JPanel[] row : boardPanel){
        for(JPanel box : row){
            gamePanel.add(box);
        }
    }
}

public void drawBoard(){
    for(int y = 0; y < 8; y++){
        for(int x = 0; x < 8; x++){
            Box box = new Box();
            box.setColour(board.getSquare(x, y).getColour());
            box.setCol(x);
            box.setRow(y);
            box.repaint();
            boardPanel[x][y].add(box);
        }
    }
}

}

class Box extends JComponent{
JPanel[][] boardPanel;
Board board;
Color boxColour;
int col, row;
public Box(){
    repaint();
}
public void paint(Graphics drawBox){
    drawBox.setColor(boxColour);
    drawBox.drawRect(50*col, 50*row, 50, 50);
    drawBox.fillRect(50*col, 50*row, 50, 50);
}
public void setColour(Color boxColour){
    this.boxColour = boxColour;
}

public void setCol(int col){
    this.col = col;
}

public void setRow(int row){
    this.row = row;
}

}

...and the class that instantiates "board":

public class Game {

@SuppressWarnings("unused")
public static void main(String[] args) 
        throws Throwable{
    Board board = new Board();
    View view = new View();
}

}

Exception happens here:

        for(JPanel[] row : boardPanel){
        for(JPanel box : row){
            gamePanel.add(box);
        }
    }
share|improve this question
1  
Can you put the code here? With location of the definitions. –  Navi Jan 11 '11 at 21:01
    
Added some code... –  Alex Jan 11 '11 at 21:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Note, I have already initialized board in the class Game so if I do it again, won't they be two totally different Board objects?

Yes, you'll then have two totally different instances. You're getting the basic idea - you have instances of objects in your program and now you have to get them to work together.

Now if I want to access the Square[][] through the object board (in Game) of type Board. Do I just declare a variable with the same name and type or do I have to initialize it again?

You have 2 ways to give Game access to the squares (probably more than just 2 depending on how you look at it):

1 Have the Board provide access to the Squares (e.g. a getter method on Board that returns the Squares array) so Game can access them. Board can then save the reference (have its own instance variable to hold the reference to squares, or can ask Board each time for the reference).

2 Have the Board provide methods that do the things that Game wants to do on the the squares, i.e. the game asks the board to do something to the squares and the board does the action on the squares.

share|improve this answer
1  
Oh, but Game has access to Board and the Squares. Game has an instance of Board. What I meant was that I'm trying to separate model from gui and I need a reference to "board", the same instance that is in Game, in my gui class. –  Alex Jan 11 '11 at 21:34
1  
Best answer so far. I would add that with the information given option (2) above seems more appropriate. The Game should not have direct access to the Squares, it should make calls to the Board to manipulate them indirectly. –  Dave Costa Jan 11 '11 at 21:35
1  
@Alex -- to make this answer more relevant to your specific problem, you would probably go with option (1) which means that Game should have a getBoard() method that returns its board reference. –  Dave Costa Jan 11 '11 at 21:38
1  
Alright, thanks. If you don't mind me asking, what is that going to help? Should I create an instance of Game in my View class to access board, and then create an instance of View in my Game class to provide the GUI? –  Alex Jan 11 '11 at 21:40
1  
Just what I was looking for, thanks! –  Alex Jan 11 '11 at 22:58

The reason for the NPE is that the board field in the View class is not actually initialized. When you declare a field, if you don't provide an initializer by default it is initialized to null, so the statement Board board; declares a field board that refers to null.

You could eliminate the NPE by instead declaring Board board = new Board();, but this will create a new instance, which isn't what you want. Instead, here are two options:

  1. Add a getter and setter for the board field in the View class and call it from the main method:

    public class View extends JFrame {
        Board      board;
        // ...
    
        public Board getBoard() { return board; }
        public void setBoard(Board b) { this.board = b; }
    }
    
    public class Game {
        @SuppressWarnings("unused")
        public static void main(String[] args) 
            throws Throwable{
        Board board = new Board();
        View view = new View();
        view.setBoard(board);
    }
    

    }

  2. Pass the parameter in the constructor, if you need to access the object from the constructor:

    public class View extends JFrame {
        Board      board;
        // ...
    
        View(Board b) {
            this.board = b;
            // ...
        }
    }
    
    public class Game {
        @SuppressWarnings("unused")
        public static void main(String[] args) 
            throws Throwable{
        Board board = new Board();
        View view = new View(board);
    }
    

A third option is to use a singleton pattern as mentioned by Gursel Koca, but I prefer to avoid it when possible because it can be a pain to undo if you later decide you actually do need more than one instance of a class.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Good answer. I passed it to the method in View that actually needed it, as a parameter. I'm still getting a NPE though, from another source I think. Can't seem to find what's wrong so I might ask another question here about it. –  Alex Jan 12 '11 at 13:08

They are 2 different objects. You should not be getting NPE if you have new'd them. May be your code snippet would help here to detect the NPE or a stack trace of the NPE would help too.

Board board1 = new Board(); //creates a new Board object 
Board board2 = new Board(); //creates another new Board object
share|improve this answer

The instance of Board that you are creating in your main() method is not the same as the instance variable board of your View class. View has the following:

public class View extends JFrame { 
  Board      board;
  ...

This variable board is never assigned a value (i.e. a new Board())

Then, in your Game class's main method, you declare a new Board and a new View:

Board board = new Board();
View view = new View();

This variable board is a local variable of the main method, and has no relationship to the instance variable board in your View. In your View class, you need to change your variable declaration to be:

Board board = new Board();
share|improve this answer

NPE is caused by an object not being instantiated. So resolving it requires instantiation. You do that with the new operator so new Board()

share|improve this answer
    
Oh okay, but that's what I'm confused about. I already have instantiated it in one of my classes, and I want to use that particular object. If I instantiate it again, won't it create a different object? What I'm saying is, I already have Board board = new Board(); in one of my classes, say class A. If I instantiate it again in class B using Board board = new Board() and then use the reference "board", will it refer to the same instance as in class A? –  Alex Jan 11 '11 at 20:54
    
It depends where you define the board variable that is the scope –  Navi Jan 11 '11 at 20:56
    
it does not depend on scope. They are totally different objects.. If you want to access every time to same board object, you can use singleton pattern.. –  Gursel Koca Jan 11 '11 at 21:05
    
Bad answer. NPE is caused by a null reference. Creating a new instance is far from the only way to set a reference to something other than null. –  Dave Costa Jan 11 '11 at 21:33
    
Other ways such as what? –  Navi Jan 11 '11 at 21:38

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