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For simplicity, I will give a quick example of what i am trying to achieve:

Table 1 - Members

  ID    |   Name
--------------------
  1     |   John    
  2     |   Mike    
  3     |   Sam  


Table 1 - Member_Selections

  ID    |   planID
--------------------
  1     |   1    
  1     |   2    
  1     |   1    
  2     |   2    
  2     |   3    
  3     |   2    
  3     |   1    


Table 3 - Selection_Details

planID  |   Cost
--------------------
  1     |   5    
  2     |   10    
  3     |   12  

When i run my query, I want to return the sum of the all member selections grouped by member. The issue I face however (e.g. table 2 data) is that some members may have duplicate information within the system by mistake. While we do our best to filter this data up front, sometimes it slips through the cracks so when I make the necessary calls to the system to pull information, I also want to filter this data.

the results SHOULD show:

Results Table

ID  |    Name    | Total_Cost
-----------------------------
1   |    John    |   15
2   |    Mike    |   22
3   |    Sam     |   15

but instead have John as $20 because he has plan ID #1 inserted twice by mistake.

My query is currently:

SELECT
    sq.ID, sq.name, SUM(sq.premium) AS total_cost
FROM
(
    SELECT
    m.id, m.name, g.premium
    FROM members m
    INNER JOIN member_selections s USING(ID)
    INNER JOIN selection_details g USING(planid)
) sq group by sq.agent

Adding DISTINCT s.planID filters the results incorrectly as it will only show a single PlanID 1 sold (even though members 1 and 3 bought it).

Any help is appreciated.

EDIT

There is also another table I forgot to mention which is the agent table (the agent who sold the plans to members).

the final group by statement groups ALL items sold by the agent ID (which turns the final results into a single row).

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps the simplest solution is to put a unique composite key on the member_selections table:

 alter table member_selections add unique key ms_key (ID, planID);

which would prevent any records from being added where the unique combo of ID/planID already exist elsewhere in the table. That'd allow only a single (1,1)

comment followup:

just saw your comment about the 'alter ignore...'. That's work fine, but you'd still be left with the bad duplicates in the table. I'd suggest doing the unique key, then manually cleaning up the table. The query I put in the comments should find all the duplicates for you, which you can then weed out by hand. once the table's clean, there'll be no need for the duplicate-handling version of the query.

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moving forward this is a great suggestion - I need to filter these results as they are however so the issue above still exists. –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 21:06
    
@JM4 Then you can try the query I suggested, I hope it will work. Note the distinct keyword. –  Ilya Kogan Jan 11 '11 at 21:11
    
@Ilya Kogan - your query is invalid. see my notes –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 21:13
    
@Marc B - I think your query plans for the future, I 'BELIEVE' the use of "ALTER IGNORE TABLE member_selections ADD UNIQUE KEY(ID, planID)" works. If you can provide insight (i have tested and I think it worked), I'll accept your answer –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 21:22
    
SELECT ID, planID, count(*) as dup_count FROM member_selections GROUP BY ID, planID HAVING dup_count > 1; that should show you which ones have two or more duplicates, which you could then remove somehow. Obviously a single delete query on them will nuke all the records, not just the dupes. maybe a delete/reinsert would work. –  Marc B Jan 11 '11 at 21:25
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Use UNIQUE keys to prevent accidental duplicate entries. This will eliminate the problem at the source, instead of when it starts to show symptoms. It also makes later queries easier, because you can count on having a consistent database.

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What about:

SELECT
    sq.ID, sq.name, SUM(sq.premium) AS total_cost
FROM
(
    SELECT
    m.id, m.name, g.premium
    FROM members m
    INNER JOIN 
         (select distinct ID, PlanID from member_selections) s
    USING(ID)
    INNER JOIN selection_details g USING(planid)
) sq group by sq.agent

By the way, is there a reason you don't have a primary key on member_selections that will prevent these duplicates from happening in the first place?

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llya - a primary key does no good here (yes the table has a primary key) but the unique key creation as mentioned below is the right approach. –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 21:07
    
note: the primary key is simply an auto-incremented key for each record inserted. I was unaware you could create unique keys as they suggest below (and here: awesomeful.net/posts/19-mysql-unique-key) –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 21:10
    
Your answer is incorrect - you are selecting a unique ID (call it a memberID if you will, not a unique plan ID in regards to the member_selections). A single member can have multiple planIDs and several planIDs can have several parents within the same table –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 21:12
    
@JM4, if this doesn't work, you can try (select ID, PlanID from member_selections group by ID, PlanID) instead of (select distinct ID, PlanID from member_selections) –  Ilya Kogan Jan 12 '11 at 3:39
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You can add a group by clause into the inner query, which groups by all three columns, basically returning only unique rows. (I also changed 'premium' to 'cost' to match your example tables, and dropped the agent part)

SELECT
    sq.ID, 
    sq.name, 
    SUM(sq.Cost) AS total_cost
FROM
(
    SELECT
            m.id, 
            m.name, 
            g.Cost
    FROM 
            members m
            INNER JOIN member_selections s USING(ID) 
            INNER JOIN selection_details g USING(planid)

        GROUP BY
            m.ID,
            m.NAME,
            g.Cost
) sq 
group by 
    sq.ID,
    sq.NAME
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thanks torrents, I needed to use the unique key's as mentioned below so went the 'proper' route. appreciate your help though. The code looks right. –  JM4 Jan 11 '11 at 23:15
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