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I am trying to use Jasmine to write some BDD specs for basic jQuery AJAX requests. I am currently using Jasmine in standalone mode (i.e. through SpecRunner.html). I have configured SpecRunner to load jquery and other .js files. Any ideas why the following doesn't work? has_returned does not become true, even thought the "yuppi!" alert shows up fine.

describe("A jQuery ajax request should be able to fetch...", function() {

  it("an XML file from the filesystem", function() {
    $.ajax_get_xml_request = { has_returned : false };  
    // initiating the AJAX request
    $.ajax({ type: "GET", url: "addressbook_files/addressbookxml.xml", dataType: "xml",
             success: function(xml) { alert("yuppi!"); $.ajax_get_xml_request.has_returned = true; } }); 
    // waiting for has_returned to become true (timeout: 3s)
    waitsFor(function() { $.ajax_get_xml_request.has_returned; }, "the JQuery AJAX GET to return", 3000);
    // TODO: other tests might check size of XML file, whether it is valid XML
    expect($.ajax_get_xml_request.has_returned).toEqual(true);
  }); 

});

How do I test that the callback has been called? Any pointers to blogs/material related to testing async jQuery with Jasmine will be greatly appreciated.

thanks in advance

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6 Answers 6

I guess there are two types of tests you can do:

  1. Unit tests that fake the AJAX request (using Jasmine's spies), enabling you to test all of your code that runs just before the AJAX request, and just afterwards. You can even use Jasmine to fake a response from the server. These tests would be faster - and they would not need to handle asynchronous behaviour - since there isn't any real AJAX going on.
  2. Integration tests that perform real AJAX requests. These would need to be asynchronous.

Jasmine can help you do both kinds of tests.

Here is a sample of how you can fake the AJAX request, and then write a unit test to verify that the faked AJAX request was going to the correct URL:

it("should make an AJAX request to the correct URL", function() {
    spyOn($, "ajax");
    getProduct(123);
    expect($.ajax.mostRecentCall.args[0]["url"]).toEqual("/products/123");
});

function getProduct(id) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "/products/" + id,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "json"
    });
}

Here is a similar unit test that verifies your callback was executed, upon an AJAX request completing successfully:

it("should execute the callback function on success", function () {
    spyOn($, "ajax").andCallFake(function(options) {
        options.success();
    });
    var callback = jasmine.createSpy();
    getProduct(123, callback);
    expect(callback).toHaveBeenCalled();
});

function getProduct(id, callback) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "/products/" + id,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "json",
        success: callback
    });
}

Finally, you have hinted elsewhere that you might want to write integration tests that make real AJAX requests - for integration purposes. This can be done using Jasmine's asyncronous features: waits(), waitsFor() and runs():

it("should make a real AJAX request", function () {
    var callback = jasmine.createSpy();
    getProduct(123, callback);
    waitsFor(function() {
        return callback.callCount > 0;
    });
    runs(function() {
        expect(callback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

function getProduct(id, callback) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: "data.json",
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8"
        dataType: "json",
        success: callback
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Alex great answer. Actually I faced a similar issue for which I have opened a question Test Ajax request using the Deferred object. Could you take a look? thanks. –  Lorraine Bernard Aug 22 '12 at 20:12
9  
I really wish your answer was part of the official documentation for Jasmine. Very clear answer to a problem that has been killing me for a few days. –  Darren Newton Sep 28 '12 at 18:30
    
Excellent answer and example. Thank you. –  Steve Hansell Nov 1 '12 at 17:40
4  
This answer should really be marked as the official answer to this question. –  Nadjib Jun 20 '13 at 6:44

Look at the jasmine-ajax project: http://github.com/pivotal/jasmine-ajax.

It's a drop-in helper that (for either jQuery or Prototype.js) stubs at the XHR layer so that requests never go out. You can then expect all you want about the request.

Then it lets you provide fixture responses for all your cases and then write tests for each response that you want: success, failure, unauthorized, etc.

It takes Ajax calls out of the realm of asynchronous tests and provides you a lot of flexibility for testing how your actual response handlers should work.

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Thanks @jasminebdd, the jasmine-ajax project looks like the way to go for testing my js code. But what if I wanted to test with actual requests to the server, e.g. for connectivity/integration tests? –  mnacos Jan 14 '11 at 12:38
1  
@mnacos jasmine-ajax is mostly useful for unit testing in which case you specifically want to avoid the call to the server. If you're doing integration tests, this is probably not what you want and should be designed as a separate test strategy. –  Sebastien Martin Apr 13 '12 at 15:37

When I specify ajax code with Jasmine, I solve the problem by spying on whatever depended-on function initiates the remote call (like, say, $.get or $ajax). Then I retrieve the callbacks set on it and test them discretely.

Here's an example I gisted recently:

https://gist.github.com/946704

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I have a fairly in-depth article on how to test asynchronous javascript functions using Jasmine. If it is any help here is the article: http://www.larsavery.com/blog/how-to-test-asynchronous-javascript-functions-using-jasmine/

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here is a simple example test suite for an app js like this

var app = {
               fire: function(url, sfn, efn) {
                   $.ajax({
                       url:url,
                       success:sfn,
                       error:efn
                   });
                }
         };

a sample test suite, which will call callback based on url regexp

describe("ajax calls returns", function() {
 var successFn, errorFn;
 beforeEach(function () {
    successFn = jasmine.createSpy("successFn");
    errorFn = jasmine.createSpy("errorFn");
    jQuery.ajax = spyOn(jQuery, "ajax").andCallFake(
      function (options) {
          if(/.*success.*/.test(options.url)) {
              options.success();
          } else {
              options.error();
          }
      }
    );
 });

 it("success", function () {
     app.fire("success/url", successFn, errorFn);
     expect(successFn).toHaveBeenCalled();
 });

 it("error response", function () {
     app.fire("error/url", successFn, errorFn);
     expect(errorFn).toHaveBeenCalled();
 });
});
share|improve this answer

Try jqueryspy.com It provides an elegant jquery like syntax to describe your tests and allows callbacks to test after the ajax has complete. Its great for integration testing and you can configure maximum ajax wait times in seconds or milleseconds.

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