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i'm overriding a virtual method, and i want to call inherited. But i don't want to call the immediate ancestor, i want to call the one before.

TObject
   TDatabaseObject
      TADODatabaseObject <---call this guy
         TCustomer        <---skip this guy
            TVIP           <---from this guy

i tried casting myself as the ancestor, and call the method on that, but it led to recursive stack overflow:

procedure TVip.SetProperties(doc: IXMLDOMDocument);
begin
   TADODatabaseObject(Self).SetProperties(doc); //skip over TCustomer ancestor
   ...
end;

i tried adding the inherited keyword, but that doesn't compile:

procedure TVip.SetProperties(doc: IXMLDOMDocument);
begin
   inherited TADODatabaseObject(Self).SetProperties(doc); //skip over TCustomer ancestor
   ...
end;

Possible?

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8  
@Ian I think the alarm bells should be ringing for you now! The design of this part of your system cannot be right. –  David Heffernan Jan 11 '11 at 21:16
    
@David Heffernan And you're correct. But pretend the ancestor is TListView, i can't really redesign a class i have no control over. –  Ian Boyd Jan 11 '11 at 21:24
    
@Ian At what point do you have control? TADODatabaseObject? TCustomer? –  David Heffernan Jan 11 '11 at 21:25
1  
@David Heffernan i ask tough questions that nobody knows the answer to. –  Ian Boyd Jan 14 '11 at 21:08
    
@Ian LOL. I'd say though that I (and indeed others) answered your question stackoverflow.com/questions/4616535 but you didn't accept that...... –  David Heffernan Jan 14 '11 at 21:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can't in a regular language way, as this would break the object oriented aspects of the language.

You can fiddle around with pointers and clever casts to do this, but before even starting to answer that: is this really what you want?

As others mentioned: your need sounds like a serious "design smell" (which is similar to code smell, but more severe.

Edit:

Going down the pointer fiddling road might save you work in the short term, and cost you weeks of work in the long term.
This makes for some good reading on that: Upstream decisions, downstream costs.

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1  
+1 for design smell –  David Heffernan Jan 11 '11 at 21:53
1  
Accepted for "cannot do" –  Ian Boyd Jan 14 '11 at 21:09
1  
It is interesting to note that you can get an endless recursion (stack overflow time!) if you try to "jump up the class hierarchy" and you're invoking a virtual method. –  Warren P Jan 14 at 21:53
1  
Yes, this is a serious design smell, but occasionally it might be justified, for instance when you know the class hierarchy but can't do anything about the class that's 'getting in the way'. (I had to do this once to hide certain Windows messages from TChart whilst still taking advantage of the default processing in TWinControl underneath.) user246408's answer below works and is the best way to achieve this. –  Ian Goldby Jun 18 at 8:20
    
@IanGoldby interesting use case. Did you contact the TChart guys to have it resolved? –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jun 21 at 18:43

You can do it using a hack of obtaining static address of virtual method:

type
  TBase = class
    procedure Foo; virtual;
  end;

  TAnsestor = class(TBase)
    procedure Foo; override;
  end;

  TChild = class(TAnsestor)
    procedure Foo; override;
    procedure BaseFoo;
  end;

procedure TBase.Foo;
begin
  ShowMessage('TBase');
end;

procedure TAnsestor.Foo;
begin
  ShowMessage('TAnsestor');
end;

procedure TChild.Foo;
begin
  ShowMessage('TChild');
end;

type
  TFoo = procedure of object;

procedure TChild.BaseFoo;
var
  Proc: TFoo;

begin
  TMethod(Proc).Code := @TBase.Foo; // Static address
  TMethod(Proc).Data := Self;
  Proc();
end;

procedure TForm4.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Obj: TChild;
  Proc: TFoo;

begin
  Obj:= TChild.Create;
  Obj.BaseFoo;
// or else
  TMethod(Proc).Code := @TBase.Foo; // Static address
  TMethod(Proc).Data := Obj;
  Proc();

  Obj.Free;
end;
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2  
+1 If he really wants to do this then so be it!! –  David Heffernan Jan 11 '11 at 22:13
    
This is a great trick, I used it in this scenario - I use a 3rd party framework, the inherited method does wrong thing - eats exceptions that I want to catch, so I need to skip it, re-implement a slightly modified logic of it, then call the "grandfather"( TBase)'s method. –  Edwin Yip Jul 29 at 8:18

I remember I had to do something like this some years ago working around some design limitation of VCL hierarchy.

So it seems it was something like this:

type
  TGrandParent = class(TObject)
  public
    procedure Show;virtual;
  end;

  TParent = class(TGrandParent)
  public
    procedure Show;override;
  end;

  THackParent = class(TGrandParent)
  private
    procedure CallInheritedShow;
  end;

  TMyObject = class(TParent)
  public
    procedure Show;override;
  end;


{ TGrandParent }

procedure TGrandParent.Show;
begin
  MessageDlg('I''m the grandparent', mtInformation, [mbOk], 0);
end;

{ TParent }

procedure TParent.Show;
begin
  inherited;
  MessageDlg('I''m the parent', mtInformation, [mbOk], 0);
end;

{ THackParent }

procedure THackParent.CallInheritedShow;
begin
  inherited Show;
end;

{ TVIP }

procedure TMyObject.Show;
begin
  THackParent(Self).CallInheritedShow;
end;

procedure TForm6.Button6Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  VIP: TMyObject;
begin
  VIP:=TMyObject.Create;
  try
    VIP.Show;
  finally
    VIP.Free;
  end;
end;

Not supper-elegant but still a solution :)

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If you really want to do this then you should extract into a separate protected method the part of the inheritance hierarchy that you want to be able to reference directly. This will allow you to call it from anywhere without virtual method dispatch defeating you.

However, as I have commented, it seems like there is something awry with your class design.

share|improve this answer
    
To both: something is off with the design. But the ancestor is canned and functioning. i will probably end up completely gutting it, introducing many bugs in the process. i was hoping this one line of code would save me a few days of work. –  Ian Boyd Jan 11 '11 at 21:22
    
I had a similar problem. The base classes are 30,000 lines of third party component code. –  Warren P Jan 14 at 21:21

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