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Is it correct to allocate memory for an array that is set as a property in the method initWithNibName if i don't want to allocate memory for it anymore (even if the view is pop and then is pushed again)?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, if a view is shown and then hidden, it will receive both an initWithNibName and then a release; so what you should do is something like this:

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
   yourArray = [[NSArray alloc] init];
}

- (void) dealloc
{
   [yourArray release];
   [super dealloc];
}

No matter how short the view controller's life, it will nonetheless receive a release upon being dismissed, which in turn will eventually result in dealloc being called.

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Its is correct, only make sure to release it in your dealloc. make sure that when you alloc initing you DO NOT use your setter, instead you should alloc init the instance variable directly:

_myArray = [[NSArray alloc]init];

if you want to go only through the property method then do something like this:

self.myArray = [NSArray array];

and again, dont forget to release it in your dealloc:

 -(void)dealloc
{
    [_myArray release];
    [super dealloc];
}
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why should't i use my setter? Thanks –  xger86x Jan 11 '11 at 22:36
    
Because if you have a "retain" (which you probably have) or "copy" property, then if you will use your setter when you alloc initing then this object will get retained twice: 1. At the alloc method. 2. At your setter. and that will cause your memory to leak since you are calling "release" only once. (and you SHOULD call release only once.) so, if you want to use the setter, get an autoreleased object. –  Avraham Shukron Jan 12 '11 at 7:42

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