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Short and simple. I've got a huge list of date-times like this as strings:

Jun 1 2005  1:33PM
Aug 28 1999 12:00AM

I'm going to be shoving these back into proper datetime fields in a database so I need to magic them into real datetime objects.

Any help (even if it's just a kick in the right direction) would be appreciated.

Edit: This is going through Django's ORM so I can't use SQL to do the conversion on insert.

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2  
Added tag for Django, since that appears to be a constraint. :-) –  Ben Blank Jan 21 '09 at 18:10
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6 Answers 6

up vote 209 down vote accepted

Check out strptime in the time module. It is the inverse of strftime.

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For the provided examples, the format string would be time.strptime(stamp, '%b %d %Y %I:%M%p'). –  Ben Blank Jan 21 '09 at 18:15
    
I'm not sure why this got buried but it's the one that works. –  Oli Jan 21 '09 at 18:19
6  
From what I understand, this answer only outputs time objects, not datetime objects -- which is why the answer would be buried compared to Patrick's answer. –  Alexander Bird Sep 7 '10 at 13:08
3  
the answer below (by Patrick Harrington) is more correct, because time.strptime only outputs time, not datetime –  Anatoly G Jun 19 '11 at 19:56
1  
As Alexander said, this return a struct_time, not a datetime. Of course you can convert it to a datetime, but Patrick's answer is more straight forward if you want a datetime object in the end. –  Leandro Alves Mar 9 '13 at 15:20
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from datetime import datetime

date_object = datetime.strptime('Jun 1 2005  1:33PM', '%b %d %Y %I:%M%p')

Link to the Python documentation for strptime

and a link for the strftime format mask

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The datetime module itself doesn't have the strptime function, but the datetime-class within the datetime module does :-) from datetime import datetime date_object = datetime.strptime(...) –  Horst Gutmann Jan 21 '09 at 18:22
1  
+1: this is more compatible with Django. –  S.Lott Jan 21 '09 at 18:59
13  
+1: this is more complete than the currently-accepted answer (which references strptime but doesn't show how to use it) –  Carl Meyer Jan 21 '09 at 19:25
3  
+1 for the link for the strftime format mask :-P –  semente Apr 13 '12 at 19:09
    
Wait, what's the point of the first string Jun 1 2005 1:33PM? Is it more like an arbitrary template or something? –  hobbes3 Apr 14 '12 at 15:33
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Use the third party dateutil library:

from dateutil import parser
dt = parser.parse("Aug 28 1999 12:00AM")

It can handle most date formats, including the one you need to parse. It's more convenient than strptime as it can guess the correct format most of the time.

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9  
Be aware that for large data amounts this might not be the most optimal way to approach the problem. Guessing the format every single time may be horribly slow. –  Reef Jul 3 '11 at 0:08
3  
This is nice but it would be nice to have a solution that is built-in rather than having to go to a third party. –  brian buck Oct 12 '11 at 20:33
    
When I try to parse "32nd jan", it returns me "2032-01-06".. which is incorrect. is there any way to check whether the string is a valid date or not –  Kartik Mar 6 '13 at 6:11
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@Reef: 5 times as slow according to my quick and dirty benchmark. Not so horribly slow as I would expect. –  Antony Hatchkins Apr 30 '13 at 18:19
    
so graceful! it helps! thank you, Simon! –  zx1986 Jul 15 '13 at 2:36
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Something that isn't mentioned here and is useful: adding a suffix to the day. I decoupled the suffix logic so you can use it for any number you like, not just dates.

import time

def num_suffix(n):
    '''
    Returns the suffix for any given int
    '''
    suf = ('th','st', 'nd', 'rd')
    n = abs(n) # wise guy
    tens = int(str(n)[-2:])
    units = n % 10
    if tens > 10 and tens < 20:
        return suf[0] # teens with 'th'
    elif units <= 3:
        return suf[units]
    else:
        return suf[0] # 'th'

def day_suffix(t):
    '''
    Returns the suffix of the given struct_time day
    '''
    return num_suffix(t.tm_mday)

# Examples
print num_suffix(123)
print num_suffix(3431)
print num_suffix(1234)
print ''
print day_suffix(time.strptime("1 Dec 00", "%d %b %y"))
print day_suffix(time.strptime("2 Nov 01", "%d %b %y"))
print day_suffix(time.strptime("3 Oct 02", "%d %b %y"))
print day_suffix(time.strptime("4 Sep 03", "%d %b %y"))
print day_suffix(time.strptime("13 Nov 90", "%d %b %y"))
print day_suffix(time.strptime("14 Oct 10", "%d %b %y"))​​​​​​​
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I have put together a project that can convert some really neat expressions. Check out timestring.

Here are some examples below:

pip install timestring
>>> import timestring
>>> timestring.Range('next week')
<timestring.Range From 03/03/14 00:00:00 to 03/10/14 00:00:00 4496004880>
>>> timestring.Date('monday, aug 15th 2015 at 8:40 pm')
<timestring.Date 2015-08-15 20:40:00 4491909392>

Thank you

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Wow. Wow. Wow. Wow. This is so easy. I've got a datetime string and I just want to pull out the year. As simple as: import timestring timestring.Date('27 Mar 2014 12:32:29 GMT').year This lib made it SO EASY! Thank you. –  brandonjp Apr 11 at 5:09
    
Your very welcome. I would love your comments and ideas on improving this package. Let me know, use github issues. Thanks! –  Steve Peak Apr 14 at 14:30
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Many timestamps have an implied timezone. To ensure that your code will work in every timezone, you should use UTC internally and attach a timezone each time a foreign object enters the system.

Python 3.2+:

>>> import time, datetime
>>> datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(
...     time.mktime(time.strptime("March 5, 2014, 20:13:50", "%B %d, %Y, %H:%M:%S")),
...     tz=datetime.timezone(datetime.timedelta(hours=-3))
... ).isoformat()
'2014-03-05T20:13:50-03:00'

or alternatively

>>> datetime.datetime.strptime(
...     "March 5, 2014, 20:13:50", "%B %d, %Y, %H:%M:%S"
... ).replace(tzinfo=datetime.timezone(datetime.timedelta(hours=-3)))
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protected by casperOne Apr 26 '12 at 12:03

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