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How are you doing?

Am kinda stuck with this problem, I need to use a for loop to find a word that ends with 'ing' and is preceded by a tag that is IN, I come from a background of C and java and there its easy to do, but I cant yet grasp how to do it in python!!

I searched around and here is what I think i need to do:

for word, tag in list:
    if word.endswith('ing'):
       //use regular expression here which should look like this '(?<=\bIN\b)ing'

now ofcourse there are some problems there, first I the I need to look at the previous tag not word, the regular expression is probably is wrong and more importantly this just sounds too complicated, am I missing something here, is there a way to just use the index of the word ending with 'ing' to look at the tag behind it like I would have done using java for example??

Thank you in advance and sorry if its a silly question, its like my second time trying to write python and am still rusty with it =)

EDIT: more explanation on what I need to do, and an example here is what am trying to solve, sometimes pos_tag mistakes a VBG for a noun, so i need to write a method that given a tagged list (for example [('Cultivate', 'NNP'), ('peace', 'NN'), ('by', 'IN'), ('observing', 'NN'), ('justice', 'NN')] corrects this problem and returns [('Cultivate', 'NNP'), ('peace', 'NN'), ('by', 'IN'), ('observing', 'VBG'), ('justice', 'NN')] ) notice how observing has changed

EDIT2: problem solved now, here is the solution def transform(li): for i in xrange(len(li)): if li[i][0].endswith('ing') and i > 0 and li[i-1][1]: li[i] = (li[i], 'VBG')

thank you guys all for your help =D appreciated it

share|improve this question
2  
What problem are you actually trying to solve? – Anon. Jan 11 '11 at 22:40
1  
It's not very clear what your input/output is. Why are you extracting 2 values from your list? Is it a list of tuples? Also you shouldn't use the variable name list as it overrides the builtin function list – Falmarri Jan 11 '11 at 22:42
    
Try showing a sample of the input and corresponding output. – Karl Knechtel Jan 11 '11 at 22:43
    
here is what am trying to solve, sometimes pos_tag mistakes a VBG for a noun, so i need to write a method that given a tagged list (for example [('Cultivate', 'NNP'), ('peace', 'NN'), ('by', 'IN'), ('observing', 'NN'), ('justice', 'NN')] corrects this problem and returns us [('Cultivate', 'NNP'), ('peace', 'NN'), ('by', 'IN'), ('observing', 'VBG'), ('justice', 'NN')] ) notice how observing has changed – r3x Jan 11 '11 at 22:45
    
Do you have any control on the list prior to this loop? ie, for word, tag in list: implies that list is comprised of alternating between a word of interest and the tag. Is tag the same as word or do you need to look at tag from the proceeding loop through? If you say your goal is easy in C or Java, write that down. Python can express the same algorithm as the C form. Then focus on the idiom after you have what you want working. – dawg Jan 11 '11 at 22:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on your comment, sounds like you want this:

def transform(li):
    new_li = []
    prev_tag = None
    for word, tag in li:
        if word.endswith('ing') and prev_tag == 'NN':
            tag = 'VBG'
        new_li += [(word, tag)]
        prev_tag = tag
    return new_li

You can also do this in-place:

def transform(li):
    for i in xrange(len(li)):
        if li[i][0].endswith('ing') and i > 0 and li[i-1][1]:
            li[i] = (li[i], 'VBG')

Note that I renamed list to li. list is the type-name for a Python list and overriding it is a bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
How does transform looks at the tag of the previous word, if am not mistaken, it just checks if word ends with ing and it's tag (not the one before it) is 'NN', I need to look at the previous tag not word's tag – r3x Jan 11 '11 at 22:56
    
@AnH Sorry, I didn't see your very last comment (which cleared it up) until now. I think I understood you this time? – marcog Jan 11 '11 at 22:58
    
gr8 =), if u still unsure of what I meant, feel free to ask and i will try my best to explain it again or give u another example, also thanks for the heads up about the li and overriding list =D – r3x Jan 11 '11 at 23:01
    
@AnH Answer's been updated. Does that do what you want? – marcog Jan 11 '11 at 23:03
    
it looks about right, and really similar of what I would have done in java for example, I knew using regular expressions' lookbehind was not the correct way to solve this...I will try to run it now and see if would work =) – r3x Jan 11 '11 at 23:08

This does the change in place

for index,(word, _tag) in enumerate(li):
    if word.endswith('ing') and i > 0 and li[index-1][1] == 'IN':
        li[index] = word, 'VBG'

enumerate allows you to iterate over a list in a foreach fashion, but also get access to the current index. I quite like it, but I sometimes worry if I overuse it and should use something like for i in xrange(10): ... instead.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks thats helpful =) – r3x Jan 12 '11 at 1:37
previousWord = ""
previousTag = ""

for word, tag in list:
    if word.endswith('ing'):
       //use regular expression here which should look like this '(?<=\bIN\b)ing'
       //use previousWord and previousTag here
    previousWord = word
    previousTag = tag
share|improve this answer

Your solution is somewhat driven by having immutable tuples as the data pairs in your list. The easiest way then is to create the new list you want in total:

li=[('Cultivate', 'NNP'), 
    ('peace', 'NN'), 
    ('by', 'IN'), 
    ('observing', 'NN'), 
    ('justice', 'NN')]

lnew=[]    

for word, tag in li:
    if word.endswith('ing') and tag == 'NN':
        tag='VBG'
    lnew.append((word,tag))

for word, tag in lnew:
    print word, tag

Somewhat wasteful if you have thousands or millions...

If this is your data and your format that you control, you may wish to consider using a dictionary instead of a list of tuples. Then you can loop the dictionary through more naturally and modify in place:

ld={'justice': 'NN', 'Cultivate': 'NNP', 'peace': 'NN', 
    'observing': 'NN', 'by': 'IN'}

for word, tag in ld.items():
    if word.endswith('ing') and tag == 'NN':
       ld[word]='VBG'

In large data sets, the dictionary approach is faster and more memory efficient. Consider that.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks man, but already figured out the answer, thanks anyways =) – r3x Jan 11 '11 at 23:27

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