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Why are we still using javascript 'only' in web-browsers theses days? It doesn't support custom operators(I use for vector math), structs(value types) & a huge number of other basic Object Oriented principles that greatly improve the programmers coding ability in power & speed?

Why don't we use the openSource .NET CLR Mono instead or something equivalent? Why people insist on just putting hack in's to existing old languages is beyond me.. I mean we have a chance here with HTLM5 to start clean.

Also why are we not passing the client computer a pre-compiled library instead of embedded javascript code? This would greatly increase performance, not to mention the the code-behind is crapping up the HTML markup & in my mind is all totally just wrong...

I would love to make some web-apps for say ChromeOS, but i'm not going to touch the crap if javascript doesn't even have operators.

Sorry for the frustrated tones i'm giving, but I see something with great potential here in ChromeOS's model but if they want to compete with MS then they need to focus on better Dev tools for the people that make there stuff tick. Thats the one thing I rly like about MS, they have killer languages & tools for them.

NOTE: I'm not a web-developer(as you can probably guess why), so correct me if i'm wrong on anything or need clerity tnx.

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closed as not constructive by T.J. Crowder, Domenic, Stephen Cleary, galambalazs, Matthew Crumley Jan 12 '11 at 0:17

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For someone with such a strong opinion you are very misguided. –  Tim Lloyd Jan 11 '11 at 23:25
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Why .NET and not Python? :o) –  Felix Kling Jan 11 '11 at 23:38
    
Python is the slowest out of "Java, javaScript, .NET & python". Ive found benchmarks on this before. –  zezba9000 Jan 12 '11 at 3:51
    
I may not fully understand JavaScripts object-oriented methodology, but do you understand the importance of custom value types & custom operators? I didnt mean to bring out OO in my post as much as I wanted to stress the usefulness of value types & custom operators. –  zezba9000 Jan 12 '11 at 5:29

5 Answers 5

Why are we still using javascript 'only' in web-browsers theses days? It doesn't support operators, structs(value types) & a huge number of other basic Object Oriented principles that greatly improve the programmers coding ability in power & speed?

  • "It doesn't support operators" - actually it does, like =, <, > and + and plenty of others...
  • Class-based OOP is not the only programming paradigm in the world, and it's not the answer to everything. JavaScript's prototypal OOP is much more flexible.
  • Power and speed? JavaScript is one of the fastest to work with languages. This is exactly because it does not limit the programmer to things like static typing.

Why don't we use the openSource .NET CLR Mono instead or something equivalent? Why people insist on just putting hack in's to existing old languages is beyond me.. I mean we have a chance here with HTLM5 to start clean.

  • Backwards compatibility: You can't just say "screw you" to everyone using old browsers.
  • HTML5 is built on top of existing standards. It's not a clean start at all.
  • Mono and .NET do not work on a wide range of devices which can run JavaScript, such as various mobile devices.

Also why are we not passing the client computer a pre-compiled library instead of embedded javascript code? This would greatly increase performance, not to mention the the code-behind is crapping up the HTML markup & in my mind is all totally just wrong...

  • HTML is text, CSS is text, I think it's natural for JS to be text too. It also helps when developing because you don't have to constantly keep compiling your code.
  • JS being text also helped to teach new programmers. You could simply take a look at the source code of your favorite website to find out what they were doing and how.

if they want to compete with MS then they need to focus on better Dev tools for the people that make there stuff tick. Thats the one thing I rly like about MS, they have killer languages & tools for them.

  • There's a wide range of tools available for JavaScript development. One of the most Visual Studio like tools is probaby JetBrains' WebStorm IDE
  • There are also unit testing and other testing tools, continuous integration tools, static analysis tools...

My suggestion to you would be to actually take a while to learn more about JavaScript before casting judgement upon it like this.

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When I said operators I ment custom operators which it does not have. You speek of static typing as if its a bad thing when in reality its a very good thing to have. Flexibility does not mean stability. Backwards compatibility?.. How could the browser not support a New way & the Old way? Because it would be very easy too. "Mono and .NET dot not work on a wide range of devices"?? WRONG! Yes it does. It works on Windows, Mac, Linux, iPhone, Android, Phone7, xbox & even blackberry. My suggestion to you would be to look into what .NET is & why we should be using a newer CLR like it for the web. –  zezba9000 Jan 12 '11 at 3:43
    
Calm down, you sound like you took this as some sort of personal assault... Static typing is a hinderance f.ex. when you want to join a number and a string, or include different types of objects in an array. How would Firefox 2 suddenly begin supporting Mono when it wasn't built into it? It won't. .NET does not run on any Nokia phone, so there's that. –  Jani Hartikainen Jan 12 '11 at 8:15
    
Sorry if I sound agitated, I apologize. But Static typing is not a hindrance & is more of a benefit on any major project. You have a misconception that you can't add a number & a string, because you can. For example in .NET you would say {var myString = someString+number.ToString();}. Or the opposite can be done as well {var myNum = Convert.ToInt32(someString)+number;}. In the end other developers on your team can confidently know at any time that a variable will be the same type no matter what. JavaScript 2.0 is adding strong types btw. css.dzone.com/news/objective-look-javascript-20-s –  zezba9000 Jan 12 '11 at 15:49
    
Also if you want to include different types of objects in an array in .NET, you would simply make an array of objects {var myObjects = new objects[10];} OR {var myObjects = new List<object>();} Think of an object as pointers to any object type, like a (void*) in c++. The issue of peoples browsers being out of date(like Firefox2) is not a problem with Chrome as is auto updates in the background. If you want to make your stuff run on legacy stuff, thats fine & keep using the legacy stuff, but I don't think that should hurt new & better idea's that emerge over the years from being implemented. –  zezba9000 Jan 12 '11 at 16:04
    
The rules for type coercion in cases like int+string concatenation are defined, so the developer should know what is the end result of such operations. While you can do it in .NET, it takes less code in JS, plus you can do a lot of other things (such as duck typing). Not quite sure whether JS 2.0 is very relevant yet - personally I do find AS3 style typing (similar to JS 2.0) quite okay. –  Jani Hartikainen Jan 12 '11 at 16:25

I'm not sure I understand what you're asking:

Why don't we use the openSource .NET CLR Mono instead or something equivalent? Why people insist on just putting hack in's to existing old languages is beyond me.. I mean we have a chance here with HTLM5 to start clean."

How does HTML5 give us the chance to use Mono as a replacement for Javascript?

Also why are we not passing the client computer a pre-compiled library instead of embedded javascript code? This would greatly increase performance, not to mention the the code-behind is crapping up the HTML markup & in my mind is all totally just wrong...

You're coming from the assumption that the only way to use JavaScript is to embed it inline with the HTML markup. This is horid. I prefer non-instrusive JavaScript linked in external files. These files are responsible for attaching events to elements etc, not the other way around.

The old school way is to do:

<input type="button" onclick="alert('Hello World!')">Click me</input>

Agree that with this example, JavaScript is getting in the way of clean markup. But why not just do this:

<input type="button" id="hello-button">Click me</input>

And in JavaScript file that has been included:

$('#hello-button').click(function() { alert('Hello World!'); } );

Separation of concerns can be achieved easily with JavaScript.

In terms of OO principles, we use them extensively in our application. JavaScript logic is carefully contained, separated by namespaces, and have a complete object model with functions, operators etc.

but i'm not going to touch the crap if javascript doesn't even have operators.

http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_operators.asp - or do you mean something different by operators?

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Thankx, I didnt know you didnt have to embed javascript in your HTML markup. When I said operators I ment javascript didnt have custom operators. These are very important when creating Matrix & Vector structures that can be easily used like any other value type(int, float, double ect). –  zezba9000 Jan 12 '11 at 3:27

Because its possible only in the perfect world. In the real world we have dozen of legacy apps, written on JS and thousands of web-developers, that doesn't know .Net or Java or any other similar technology. BTW, sometimes JS is not so bad as it looks.

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I'd say, JavaScript only looks bad if you don't know JavaScript. If you know how it works, even the things that looked really really strange at the beginning make completely sense. –  Felix Kling Jan 11 '11 at 23:47
    
Exactly! You just need to work with it for some time. –  Victor Haydin Jan 12 '11 at 9:36

For a while, there were a lot of "server side only" type web development going on, because there were so many differences between browsers when it came to JavaScript processing and item rendering, that it was better from a maintenance perspective to leverage these server side languages. They did all the heavy lifting and ensured you had a pretty consistent view across these browsers.

The downside to the server side only apps is the constant post back to the server, which caused an ugly "flicker" effect with applications. If you had a bad connection, or a lot of server processing, it became annoying to wait 2 minutes for a page to update itself when all you did was check a box saying you didn't want to enter a calendar date, which forced the application to hide its calendar widget and maybe do some other processing.

In addition, the view state generated by .Net applications really started to eat away a the user's experience, as more and more controls were being pushed into a single page, and controlled via AJAX or other events to display and hide them. Web pages became rather bloated by a process that was supposed to help eliminate some of that.

jQuery and CSS have been some major advances that has pushed things back to the client side model. With a uniform way of displaying data, as well as leveraging the clients machine to do a lot of the heavy lifting of showing/hiding controls, it made more sense to have apps written this way. Generally speaking they are faster than their server side counterparts, and can do most of what the server side based apps do. In addition, the view state bloat goes away. You also have the ASP.NET MVC framework, which tries to balance both worlds of giving you the server side power, but reducing a lot of the client end bloat from the view state.

In short, you'll find a lot more apps going the JavaScript route these days because you can get similar functionality, thanks to jQuery and CSS, and a lot less overhead and repeat trips back to the server.

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JavaScript is generally considered a more advanced OO language than .NET by people such as Douglas Crawford.

You do have the option of running .NET code in a web browser: it's called Silverlight / Moonlight.

Regarding the idea of only sending precompiled code, one major issue is security.

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"JavaScript is generally considered a more advanced OO language than .NET." By whom? I'm a huge JavaScript fan, but I wouldn't make that claim. .Net is a thoroughly object-oriented system, drawing on lots of prior art in the class-based realm and even recently getting some stuff from the functional languages arena (at least in C#.Net). And of course, there's JScript.Net, which is pretty thoroughly JavaScript-inspired. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 11 '11 at 23:19
    
@T.J Crowder: By me for one. Apart from Stephen. –  slebetman Jan 11 '11 at 23:30
    
I've updated with a link to Crawford's famous videos. I don't agree with everything he says, but he's got some good points. Another resource that looks like it'll be good is Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja, a Manning book being written by the author of jQuery. –  Stephen Cleary Jan 11 '11 at 23:32
    
@T.J Crowder: .Net is a thoroughly object-oriented system, drawing on lots of prior art in the class-based realm you can say the same about Javascript: Javascript is a thoroughly object-oriented system, drawing on lots of prior art in the prototype based realm which by the way is a bit older than class-based OO. –  slebetman Jan 11 '11 at 23:33
    
Apples and oranges. Depends entirely on what you understand by "object oriented" and "advanced", and of course JavaScript and .NET couldn't really have more different backgrounds. I'm not sure why Crockford would want to offer an opinion on one being more advanced than the other, except to promote his own field of expertise. When I'm doing .NET, I do sometimes pine for JavaScript's relative simplicity and small list of core objects, and I do quite like the certainty of always knowing what an operator is going to do. –  Tim Down Jan 12 '11 at 0:27

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