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I am attempting to create a small application to collect data received from an external sensor attached to COM10. I have successfully created a small C# console object and application that opens the port and streams data to a file for a fixed period of time using a for-loop.

I would like to convert this application to use the dataReceived event to stream instead. After reading the Top 5 SerialPort Tips, I still can't seem to it to work and don't know what I am missing. I rewrote the console application so that all the code is in Main and is pasted below. Can someone please help enlighten me as to why the event handler port_OnReceiveDatazz is not being called even though I know that there is data being sent to the port by the hardware?

Thanks

Azim

PS: Thanks to @Gabe, @Jason Down, and @abatishchev for all the suggestions. I am stumped and can't seem to get the event handler to work. Perhaps it has something to do with the device. I can live with just reading the port in a thread and streaming the data straight to file.


Code


namespace serialPortCollection
{   class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            const int bufSize = 2048;
            Byte[] buf = new Byte[bufSize]; //To store the received data.

            SerialPort sp = new SerialPort("COM10", 115200);
            sp.DataReceived += port_OnReceiveDatazz; // Add DataReceived Event Handler

            sp.Open();
            sp.WriteLine("$"); //Command to start Data Stream

            // Wait for data or user input to continue.
            Console.ReadLine();

            sp.WriteLine("!"); //Stop Data Stream Command
            sp.Close();
        }

       // My Event Handler Method
        private static void port_OnReceiveDatazz(object sender, 
                                   SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
        {
            SerialPort spL = (SerialPort) sender;
            const int bufSize = 12;
            Byte[] buf = new Byte[bufSize];
            Console.WriteLine("DATA RECEIVED!");
            Console.WriteLine(spL.Read(buf, 0, bufSize));
        }
    }
}
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What exactly isn't working? –  Jon B Jan 21 '09 at 18:53
    
@Jon B: The event handler never gets called even though data is being received. –  Azim Jan 21 '09 at 19:05
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6 Answers

First off I recommend you use the following constructor instead of the one you currently use:

new SerialPort("COM10", 115200, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);

Next, you really should remove this code:

// Wait 10 Seconds for data...
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    Thread.Sleep(10);
    Console.WriteLine(sp.Read(buf,0,bufSize)); //prints data directly to the Console
}

And instead just loop until the user presses a key or something, like so:

namespace serialPortCollection
{   class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            SerialPort sp = new SerialPort("COM10", 115200);
            sp.DataReceived += port_OnReceiveDatazz; // Add DataReceived Event Handler

            sp.Open();
            sp.WriteLine("$"); //Command to start Data Stream

            Console.ReadLine();

            sp.WriteLine("!"); //Stop Data Stream Command
            sp.Close();
        }

       // My Event Handler Method
        private static void port_OnReceiveDatazz(object sender, 
                                   SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
        {
            SerialPort spL = (SerialPort) sender;
            byte[] buf = new byte[spL.BytesToRead];
            Console.WriteLine("DATA RECEIVED!");
            spL.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);
            foreach (Byte b in buf)
            {
                Console.Write(b.ToString());
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }
}

Also, note the revisions to the data received event handler, it should actually print the buffer now.

UPDATE 1


I just ran the following code successfully on my machine (using a null modem cable between COM33 and COM34)

namespace TestApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Thread writeThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(WriteThread));
            SerialPort sp = new SerialPort("COM33", 115200, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);
            sp.DataReceived += port_OnReceiveDatazz; // Add DataReceived Event Handler

            sp.Open();
            sp.WriteLine("$"); //Command to start Data Stream

            writeThread.Start();

            Console.ReadLine();

            sp.WriteLine("!"); //Stop Data Stream Command
            sp.Close();
        }

        private static void port_OnReceiveDatazz(object sender, 
                                   SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
        {
            SerialPort spL = (SerialPort) sender;
            byte[] buf = new byte[spL.BytesToRead];
            Console.WriteLine("DATA RECEIVED!");
            spL.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);
            foreach (Byte b in buf)
            {
                Console.Write(b.ToString() + " ");
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        private static void WriteThread()
        {
            SerialPort sp2 = new SerialPort("COM34", 115200, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);
            sp2.Open();
            byte[] buf = new byte[100];
            for (byte i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            {
                buf[i] = i;
            }
            sp2.Write(buf, 0, buf.Length);
            sp2.Close();
        }
    }
}

UPDATE 2


Given all of the traffic on this question recently. I'm beginning to suspect that either your serial port is not configured properly, or that the device is not responding.

I highly recommend you attempt to communicate with the device using some other means (I use hyperterminal frequently). You can then play around with all of these settings (bitrate, parity, data bits, stop bits, flow control) until you find the set that works. The documentation for the device should also specify these settings. Once I figured those out, I would make sure my .NET SerialPort is configured properly to use those settings.

Some tips on configuring the serial port:

Note that when I said you should use the following constructor, I meant that use that function, not necessarily those parameters! You should fill in the parameters for your device, the settings below are common, but may be different for your device.

new SerialPort("COM10", 115200, Parity.None, 8, StopBits.One);

It is also important that you setup the .NET SerialPort to use the same flow control as your device (as other people have stated earlier). You can find more info here:

http://www.lammertbies.nl/comm/info/RS-232_flow_control.html

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Thanks. I have modified my code as you suggested but the event handler still doesn't get called. –  Azim Jan 21 '09 at 19:20
    
Are you sure the handshaking is setup properly? What serial port settings have you used in the past (in hyperterminal or whatever) to be able to communicate with it? –  Gabe Jan 21 '09 at 19:55
    
In your last edit you get the event to fire by sending data in the write thread. The write thread just simulates my device sending data. –  Azim Jan 21 '09 at 20:16
    
That's correct. I don't actually have your device, so I had to simulate it somehow. It sounds like either the device is not sending data, or your serial port is not configured properly. How have you communicated with the device in the past? –  Gabe Jan 21 '09 at 21:23
    
With the default settings when I create the serialport object. So in fact the Console.WriteLine in my for-loop does print out data being received. But the event handler never gets called. –  Azim Jan 21 '09 at 21:37
show 2 more comments

I think your issue is the line:**

sp.DataReceived += port_OnReceiveDatazz;

Shouldn't it be:

sp.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler (port_OnReceiveDatazz);

**Nevermind, the syntax is fine (didn't realize the shortcut at the time I originally answered this question).

I've also seen suggestions that you should turn the following options on for your serial port:

sp.DtrEnable = true;    // Data-terminal-ready
sp.RtsEnable = true;    // Request-to-send

You may also have to set the handshake to RequestToSend (via the handshake enumeration).


UPDATE:

Found a suggestion that says you should open your port first, then assign the event handler. Maybe it's a bug?

So instead of this:

sp.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler (port_OnReceiveDatazz);
sp.Open();

Do this:

sp.Open();
sp.DataReceived += new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler (port_OnReceiveDatazz);

Let me know how that goes.

share|improve this answer
    
+= new SerialDataReceivedEventHandler –  abatishchev Jan 21 '09 at 18:58
    
Yup, fixed er up. Thanks. –  Jason Down Jan 21 '09 at 19:00
    
yes I tried that as well. port_OnReceivedDatazz still doesn't get called even though I know for sure that data is being received. –  Azim Jan 21 '09 at 19:03
    
Use this code in any case. Else you're wrong –  abatishchev Jan 21 '09 at 19:07
    
setting DtrEnable and RtsEnable to true seems to break communication and when I close the port the device fails its internal self-test :( –  Azim Jan 21 '09 at 19:22
show 11 more comments

I was having the very same problem with a modem that had previously worked and then one day just stopped raising the DataReceived event.

The solution in my case, very randomly, was to enable RTS e.g.

sp.RtsEnable = true;

No idea why that worked on this particular bit of kit (not a comms man at all really), nor why it had worked and then stopped but it may help somebody else one day so just posting it just in case...

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Same thing for me. Quite weird, –  guiomie Jul 26 '13 at 1:09
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By the way, you can use next code in you event handler:

switch(e.EventType)
{
  case SerialData.Chars:
  {
    // means you receives something
    break;
  }
  case SerialData.Eof:
  {
    // means receiving ended
    break;
  }
}
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I believe this won't work because you are using a console application and there is no Event Loop running. An Event Loop / Message Pump used for event handling is setup automatically when a Winforms application is created, but not for a console app.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for information. unfortunately, I know longer have the hardware so I can't test. In the ended I ended up just continuously reading the port instead of using the event handlers. I will keep your suggestion in mind if we revisit this code. –  Azim Mar 14 '11 at 19:09
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Might very well be the Console.ReadLine blocking your callback's Console.Writeline, in fact. The sample on MSDN looks ALMOST identical, except they use ReadKey (which doesn't lock the console).

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