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I'm trying to call a method in a dll which I have the C++ header for. I'm calling the dll from C#. The input is a string and the output is binary data. Any of the following 3 methods would probably work, I just don't know how to make any of them work all the way. The C# declaration is made by me, so they might not be correct

1: I'm able to get the hGlobal, but I don't know how to get data from the handle.

//CMBT_LL_WINAPI INT DLLPROC  LlConvertStringToHGLOBALW(LPCWSTR pszText, _PHGLOBAL phMemory);
 [DllImport("cmll15.dll", EntryPoint = "LlConvertStringToHGLOBALW", CharSet =   CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true)]
 private static extern int _LlConvertStringToHGlobal32(string text, ref IntPtr handle);

2:

[DllImport("cmll15.dll", EntryPoint = "LlConvertStringToBLOBW", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true)]
//CMBT_LL_WINAPI INT      DLLPROC  LlConvertStringToBLOBW(LPCWSTR pszText, _PUINT8 pBytes, UINT nBytes);
private static extern int _LlConvertStringToBLOBW(string text, ref IntPtr pBytes, UInt32 nBytes);

3:

[DllImport("cmll15.dll", EntryPoint = "LlConvertStringToStreamW", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true)]
//CMBT_LL_WINAPI INT      DLLPROC  LlConvertStringToStreamW(LPCWSTR pszText, _PISTREAM pStream);
private static extern int _LlConvertStringToStreamW(string text, ref IntPtr pStream);

Updated, here is the code I think I will end up with.

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern UIntPtr GlobalSize(IntPtr hMem);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    public static extern IntPtr GlobalLock(IntPtr handle);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    public static extern IntPtr GlobalUnlock(IntPtr handle);

    [DllImport("cmll15.dll", EntryPoint = "LlConvertStringToHGLOBALW", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern int _LlConvertStringToHGlobal32(string text, ref IntPtr handle);

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IntPtr dataHandle = IntPtr.Zero;
        _LlConvertStringToHGlobal32(Contents, ref dataHandle);
        try
        {
            var size = (uint) GlobalSize(dataHandle);
            var array = new byte[size];
            IntPtr dataPtr = GlobalLock(dataHandle);
            try
            {
                Marshal.Copy(dataPtr, array, 0, array.Length);
            }
            finally
            {
                GlobalUnlock(dataPtr);
            }

            using (var fs = new FileStream("c:\\file.dat", FileMode.Create))
            {
                fs.Write(array, 0, array.Length);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            Marshal.FreeHGlobal(dataHandle);
        }
    }
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Have you tried compiling and running them? Specify the problem so that we can understand. –  Nawaz Jan 12 '11 at 9:01
1  
If you’re already specifying CharSet.Unicode, why are you also specifying ExactSpelling and EntryPoint? Those are redundant. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 12 '11 at 9:06
    
I don't think my problem is about the translation of the method from C++ to C#, but I don't know, I just showed them, so you might be able to spot anything wrong. I think the C# signature is correct, but I don't know now to call the methods or use the given output from the method –  Karsten Jan 12 '11 at 9:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first one ought to be easiest to get going because that leaves it up to the callee to figure out the required size. It is however not obvious how you are supposed to know the size of the allocation. Maybe the return value. You can always pinvoke GlobalSize() to get the size from the HGLOBAL handle. You should pinvoke GlobalLock() to convert the handle to a pointer, then Marshal.CopyMemory() to copy it into a byte[]. Cleanup by calling GlobalUnlock() and Marshal.FreeHGlobal() to release the memory, put it inside a finally block so you cannot leak.

For the second one, you should declare the 2nd argument as byte[] (not ref). Trouble is that you'll have to guess the size of the array up front. A failure mode would be guessing the size too small.

The third one requires a COM IStream. Declare it as out System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.IStream. It behaves a lot like a .NET Stream, you'd call Seek to seek to the beginning and Read to read the data.

I'd go for the first one, least likely to blow up in your face.

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I think I have the solution. It seems I do need to call GlobalLock, otherwise it won't work for me. Here is the source, feel free to improve it. IntPtr h = IntPtr.Zero; _LlConvertStringToHGlobal32(ContentsB, ref h); UIntPtr size = GlobalSize(h); var array = new byte[(int) size]; IntPtr globalLock = GlobalLock(h); Marshal.Copy(globalLock, array, 0, array.Length); –  Karsten Jan 12 '11 at 13:03
1  
You have to clean-up properly. GlobalUnlock and Marshal.FreeHGlobal. –  Hans Passant Jan 12 '11 at 13:05
    
You are right, thanks –  Karsten Jan 12 '11 at 13:13

For 1: You should have the length of binary data output and then using Marshal.Copy method as following: byte[] data = new byte[length]; Marshal.Copy(handle, data, 0, length);

For 2 & 3: what's your problem?

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About 1, I figured that out in the mean time after posting, but I don't have the length. About 2 I still don't know the length, so can't set the input to nBytes. About 3, calling the method with pStream = IntPtr.Zero fails, so I assume that it should point to a valid IStream, I don't know how to create such one or if I'm on the right track at all. –  Karsten Jan 12 '11 at 9:18
    
1: If you don't have length then the answer is no way. In C/C++, any array go with a size so you must manage to have the length. If the dll's code is in your hand, you should add a length output parameter, or else you should find is there any function in the dll support get length of the data array. The final chance, that is you should know what encoding the string text is and then you can know the length before hand (for example ASCII string then just pass text.Length or if it's UTF16 then pass text.Length * 2). –  longbkit Jan 12 '11 at 9:43
    
For 3: Please use IntPtr pStream = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(number of bytes); –  longbkit Jan 12 '11 at 9:47
    
About 3: the type is _PISTREAM, I would think it required a pointer to a IStream object? I will try to see if I can figure out the length some way.. –  Karsten Jan 12 '11 at 10:26

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