Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find the pathname with the most characters in it. There might be better ways to do this. But I would like to know why this problem occurs.

LONGEST_CNT=0
find samples/ | while read line
do
    line_lenght=$(echo $line | wc -m)
    if [[ $line_lenght -gt $LONGEST_CNT ]] 
    then
        LONGEST_CNT=$line_lenght
        LONGEST_STR=$line
    fi
done

echo $LONGEST_CNT : $LONGEST_STR

It somehow always returns:

0 :

If I print the results for debugging inside the while loop the values are correct. So why bash does not make these variables global?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 40 down vote accepted

When you pipe into a while loop in Bash, it creates a subshell. When the subshell exits, all variables return to their previous values (which may be null or unset). This can be prevented by using process substitution.

LONGEST_CNT=0
while read -r line
do
    line_length=${#line}
    if (( line_length > LONGEST_CNT ))
    then
        LONGEST_CNT=$line_length
        LONGEST_STR=$line
    fi
done < <(find samples/ )    # process substitution

echo $LONGEST_CNT : $LONGEST_STR
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this helped me a lot. –  Mark Jan 12 '11 at 10:33
    
The solution Dennis provided works, but be aware, that it violates POSIX norm. Try to 'set -o posix' and the script will not work! –  RobSis Feb 29 '12 at 12:10
2  
@Robert: The question is tagged [bash]. It is true that process substitution is not specified by POSIX. However, unless portability to POSIX-only shells is a concern, there's no reason not to use Bash-specific features. By the way, process substitution is supported by ksh and zsh. However, they don't create a subshell that causes the variable to be lost. Also note that Bash 4.2 has an option, shopt -s lastpipe which "runs the last command of a pipeline in the current shell context" (not a subshell) - unless job control is in affect. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 29 '12 at 16:11

The "correct" reply is given by Dennis. However, I find the process substitution trick extremely unreadable if the loop contains more than a few lines. When reading a script, I want to see what goes into the pipe before I see how it is processed.

So I usually prefer this trick of encapsulating the while loop in "{}".

LONGEST_CNT=0
find /usr/share/zoneinfo | \
{ while read -r line
    do
        line_length=${#line}
        if (( line_length > LONGEST_CNT ))
        then
            LONGEST_CNT=$line_length
            LONGEST_STR=$line
        fi
    done
    echo $LONGEST_CNT : $LONGEST_STR
}
share|improve this answer
    
Totally agree about the readability point. +1. Still, it's the way to go. –  0xC0000022L Feb 6 '13 at 22:56

About finding the longest pathname. Here's an alternative:

find /usr/share/zoneinfo | while read line; do
    echo `echo $line | wc -c` $line; 
done | sort -nr | head -1

# Result:
59 /usr/share/zoneinfo/right/America/Argentina/ComodRivadavia

Forgive me if this is considered off topic, I hope it helps someone.

share|improve this answer
    
Using echo to print the output from backicks is rarely useful or necessary. See useless use of echo. –  tripleee Dec 27 '13 at 9:43
    
@tripleee: AFAICT both echos are useful in this example: wc needs the input from $line, and $line needs to be displayed after the output from wc. Please, feel free to suggest improvements without adding more lines or variables. –  grebneke Dec 29 '13 at 1:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.