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edit Ok People! No need to bring this question to the abysses of SO. It might be a bit a rude question and/or rude phrasing/language for some SO elitits and/or Java/Sun/Oracle fan boys but I still believe that the question has it's place here and that is a legitimate question. Look at @Thilo answer, this is actually constructive and gave me almost all I needed to understand, have a better perspective about why the Servlet API is as it is.

The servlet API looks awkward, I don't understand it.

  • What are the benefits of it ?
  • What problems is it trying to solve ?
  • What is it good at ?
  • Doesn't the API forget good web practices like REST architecture ?
  • Why should we want to use application, session, request scope instead of other solutions ?
  • What does bring the API that don't a simple HTTP handler

Basically why is the Java platform the only one that has such an API where others use routing or URL to filesystem maps ?

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u can find useful info at this link stackoverflow.com/tags/servlets/info –  palAlaa Jan 12 '11 at 10:27
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"trying to solve"? One of the most successful APIs in programming history, it's not just "trying". –  skaffman Jan 12 '11 at 10:28
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Just because you don't understand something it doesn't mean that it's akward ;-) –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Jan 12 '11 at 10:32
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I'll be the first to agree that an API can be awkward, even if widely adopted and part of the standard (JDBC is such a case), but what is awkward about the Servlet API? Or do you mean "low-level", when you say "awkward"? You should compare it to CGI.pm, and not to a Rails-style controller framework. –  Thilo Jan 12 '11 at 10:37
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@Thilo: Servlet 3.0 brings a lot of useful annotations along which makes web.xml almost entirely superfluous. –  BalusC Jan 12 '11 at 13:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
  • What are the benefits of it ?

It allows you to write (web) server code that runs in all kinds of application servers. It is a minimal base upon which more high-level frameworks can be built. I'd say it is the Java equivalent of the CGI protocol.

  • What problems is it trying to solve ?

Define a standard interface to handle requests where the application server manages the communication with the user and the servlet implements to logic.

The main idea is that the programmer can concentrate on writing just the servlet, without having to worry about the whole HTTP stack and server (that is what the application server as a packaged solution takes care of).

It tries to handle more than just HTTP (such as requests by email), which is maybe a little overreaching (or, granted, awkward in regular use).

  • What is it good at ?

It succeeded in becoming the standard. It has been adopted by all Java application server vendors. There are no relevant competing solutions (maybe some native protocols, but nothing cross-platform).

  • Doesn't the API forget good web practices like REST architecture ?

The API is not concerned with that. It works at a lower level. TCP/IP is also not interested in good web practices.

  • What does bring the API that don't a simple HTTP handler

The Servlet API is the Java way of doing a simple HTTP handler. There is really not much more to it. Unless by simple you mean that it does not need any lifecycle and configuration management.

How else would you write a "simple HTTP handler"? If your answer is "start with public static void main, bind a listening socket, and go from there", then yes, you don't need the servlet API. But if you want to re-use any kind of standard tools or libraries, you need some API they all agree on (to encapsulate requests and configuration data and so on).

If you tie yourself to a specific HTTP server, you could actually write code without the servlet API. I think Jetty, for example, has a native interface as an alternative to javax.servlet.

But seriously, there is nothing fundamentally wrong with the servlet API.

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I corrected the last question. –  amirouche Jan 12 '11 at 10:49
    
+1 "also not sure you understand it" –  mdrg Jan 12 '11 at 10:51
    
1) Sun created the API and the vendors adopted it without - imo - see any benefits of it, apart from being compliant if THE standard, there is other ways to do web application and servlet api do not dominated the market among web application –  amirouche Jan 12 '11 at 10:52
    
2) My question is about a specific answer to a specific problem. What the servlet API try to solve that a basic HTTP Handler can do ? –  amirouche Jan 12 '11 at 10:54
    
Extremely good and detailed answer to such kind of question. –  AlexR Jan 12 '11 at 11:04

Servlet API allows adding custom functionality to web server. It does not forget REST API. REST API was introduced 10 years after Servlet API and is implemented on top of servlet API in java.

Application scope is needed to share data on application layers. The same is about session and request scopes.

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an HTTP API like WSGI specification also allow to «to share data on application layers», this is not a good reason to mix up HTTP or any other communication protocol with application related stuff. Application and Session scope is most of the time solved by higher level APIs and is solved outside by compnents outside of the server, Servlet API is the only API I know of that provides an application and session context facility at the communication layer which makes it 1) harder to understand 2) bloated server softwares. –  amirouche Oct 4 '12 at 12:38

Some of the answers are provided in the following article:

http://www.lunatech-research.fr/archives/2011/12/08/wrong-with-servlet-api

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