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I have a java program which throws an exception with 2 different messages for 2 different scenarios and I want the Junit test case to check for equality for both of these messages. As an example -

public void amethod() {
           // do some processing
        if(scenario1 == true) {
            throw new MySystemException("An error occured due to case 1 being incorrect.");
        }
        else if(scenario2 == true) {
            throw new MySystemException("An error occured as case 2 could not be found");
        }
    }  

Now the JUnit for this would be something like-

public void testAMethod() {
    // do something
    assertEquals("Expected", "Actual");
}

As I understand, in this above example, if I use the Scenario1 exception message the junit will fail when an exception is thrown for Scenario2 and vice versa.
I would like to know if there is any other way provided in Junit by which I can use this one test method and check for both the messages for the test to pass?
Something like an OR, if possible to provide the "Expected" value with both these expected message.
I hope my query is clear enough.

Thanks

UPDATE

Sorry for the delayed response, had got caught up with some other urgent matter.
Thank you all for the very nice suggestions, it certainly has helped me to understand a bit better now.
Eventually, to keep it rather simple I decided to implement a somewhat similar solution suggested by Don Roby. So created a new test class which looks like -

public void testAMethodScenario1() {
    // do the necessary
    assertEquals("Expected Exception Message 1", "Actual");
}

public void testAMethodScenario2() {
    // do the necessary
    assertEquals("Expected Exception Message 2", "Actual");
}  

Thank you all again for your responses.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You seem to be asking two things here, how to test an exception and how to assert that a value matches either of two possible expected values.

To test for an exception, you can either use a JUnit4 annotation:

@Test(expected=MySystemException.class)
public void testException() {
   amethod();
}

or use a try-catch in your test:

@Test
public void testException() {
   try {
      amethod();
      fail("MySystemException expected");
   }
   catch (MySystemException e) {
      // Success!
   }
}

And if you have only one message, in the try-catch version you can assert that you got it with an AssertEquals in the catch block.

The best testing would have separate tests for your two scenarios, and expect the correct single message. Better code might in fact have distinct exceptions for the two situations.

But the need for a more complex assertion than simple equality does come up anyway, and there's an elegant solution for it in Hamcrest matchers.

Using that for this situation, you could write something like (untested - don't trust my syntax completely):

@Test
public void testException() {
   try {
      amethod();
      fail("MySystemException expected");
   }
   catch (MySystemException e) {
      String expectedMessage1 = "An error occured due to case 1 being incorrect.";
      String expectedMessage2 = "An error occured as case 2 could not be found";
      assertThat(e.getMessage(), 
                 anyOf(equalTo(expectedMessage1), equalTo(expectedMessage2)));
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have implemented something like your suggestion here. As it is an existing codebase and hence certain restrictions to modify a lot. What I have done is instead of modifying the existing test class, created a new test class with 2 methods with obviously 2 different inputs to satisfy these 2 exception conditions. Both throw exception and then I am checking in respective methods with assertEquals for the exception message and both the test's pass. –  Swift-Tuttle Jan 17 '11 at 8:41

I think you need to manually catch the exception (for each scenario) and individually check the message:

try {
    // trigger scenario 1
    fail("An exception should have been thrown here !");
} catch (MySystemException e1) {
    assertEquals("Wrong error message", m1, e1.getMessage());
}

try {
    // trigger scenario 2
    fail("An exception should have been thrown here !");
} catch (MySystemException e2) {
    assertEquals("Wrong error message", m2, e2.getMessage());
}

Of course, you can have these scenarios defined as enum constants and simply iterate through them and check each of them within a loop, since the "copy/paste design pattern" is pretty obvious in the above code. :)

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-1: This test will certainly fail, as it's got two assertions that cannot both pass. –  Don Roby Jan 12 '11 at 13:26
    
Can you please explain ? The two assertions occur one at a time, each for its own scenario. Trigger S1 -> expect exception e1 with m1. If nothing failed so far, go on and trigger S2 -> expect exception e2 with m2. Or am I missing something ?... –  Costi Ciudatu Jan 12 '11 at 13:31
    
@Don Roby: note "// trigger scenario 1" and "// trigger scenario 2" - the point is to control which exception gets thrown, and then test for that exception. –  Tom Anderson Jan 12 '11 at 14:35
    
Don't know why my previous comment on retracting disappeared... But I retracted the downvote (had to do a fake edit on the question to enable), and now I understand what you're saying, you get an upvote instead. –  Don Roby Jan 12 '11 at 15:25

Can you predict which scenario will occur? If so, Costi's answer is correct. If not, because there's some randomness or whatever, you can write:

@Test
public void testAmethodThrowsException() {
    try {
        amethod();
        fail("amethod() should have thrown an exception");
    }
    catch (MySystemException e) {
        String msg = e.getMessage();
        assertTrue("bad message: " + msg, msg.equals("An error occured due to case 1 being incorrect.") || msg.equals("An error occured as case 2 could not be found"));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, thats what I was thinking. I cant predict. The scenarios would be random. Will try to implement. Thanks. –  Swift-Tuttle Jan 12 '11 at 12:48
    
+1: This will work, though I prefer Hamcrest. –  Don Roby Jan 12 '11 at 13:30
    
@Don Roby: Hamcrest really annoys me. I think it's because it's a fluent interface sort of thing, and fluent interfaces really annoy me. But clearly, yes, @Swift-Tuttle should consider Hamcrest and see if he likes it. –  Tom Anderson Jan 12 '11 at 14:33

The declared types of exception thrown bya method are part of its API. If you really want to distinguish different failure modes, you should declare a different exception type for each failure mode.

So, something like this:

/**
 * Do something.
 * @throws MySystemException1 in case 1.
 * @throws MySystemException2 if Foo not found.
 */
public void amethod() {
   // do some processing 
   if(scenario1 == true) {
      throw new MySystemException1("Case 1.");
    }
    else if(scenario2 == true) {
        throw new MySystemException2("Foo not found");
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for more specific exceptions. People don't do this enough. Not sure i'd recommend those particular names though. :) –  Tom Anderson Jan 12 '11 at 14:34
    
Well, I couldnt change that, as it would have required me to change a lot many things and as this was an existing code, I couldnt make lot of changes. @Tom - The exception names were just as an example. –  Swift-Tuttle Jan 17 '11 at 8:58
    
"I couldnt change that, as it would have required me to change a lot [of] things". You can still refactor towards the better design. –  Raedwald Jan 17 '11 at 12:48

@Rule solution in JUnit4:

    public class ExceptionRule implements MethodRule {
        @Override
        public Statement apply(final Statement base, final FrameworkMethod method, Object target) {
            return new Statement() {
                @Override
                public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
                    try {
                        base.evaluate();
                        Assert.fail();
                    } catch (MySystemException e) {
                         if(scenario1)
                            assertEquals("Expected error message1", e1.getMessage();
                         if(scenario2)
                            assertEquals("Expected error message2",e1.getMessage();
                }
            }
        };    
    }
}

In your testcase, use the Rule:

 @Rule public ExceptionRule rule = new ExceptionRule();
share|improve this answer
    
This is quite a different way from what I had imagined. Good food for thought though. I will see if I can implement this way. Thanks. –  Swift-Tuttle Jan 12 '11 at 12:45
    
@Swift: you're right, it's not easy way. I wrote it just for fun:) If you've many such testcases, Rule could be re-used. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Jan 12 '11 at 13:11

JUnit 4 provides (Expected Exception.class)

@Test(expected= MySystemException.class) public void empty() { 
    // what ever you want
}

Google: Expected Exceptions JUnit for more info.

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BDD Style Solution with Catch Exception

@Test
public void testAMethodScenario1() {

    //given scenario 1

    when(foo).amethod();

    then(caughtException())
            .isInstanceOf(MySystemException.class)
            .hasMessage("An error occured due to case 1 being incorrect.");
}

@Test
public void testAMethodScenario2() {

    //given scenario 2

    when(foo).amethod();

    then(caughtException())
            .isInstanceOf(MySystemException.class)
            .hasMessage("An error occured as case 2 could not be found");
}

Source code

Dependencies

com.googlecode.catch-exception:catch-exception:1.2.0
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