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I am facing the following security warning for the code mentioned below:

 if (null != FacesContext.getCurrentInstance()) {

            FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();

            if ((null != context.getApplication())
                    && (null != context.getApplication().getVariableResolver())) {

                if (null != context.getApplication().getVariableResolver()
                        .resolveVariable(context, "userBean")) {

                    Object requestObject = context.getApplication()
                            .getVariableResolver().resolveVariable(context,
                                    "userBean");

                    String pRange = ((UserBean) requestObject)
                            .getPageSize_REM();

                    page_range = Integer.parseInt(pRange);

                }

            }
        }

The warning that I am getting in fortify Report is :

Abstract: The method getList() in GrantAccessBackingBean.java can dereference a null pointer on line 2357 because it does not check the return value of resolveVariable(), which might return null. Sink: GrantAccessBackingBean.java:2353 requestObject = resolveVariable(...) : VariableResolver.resolveVariable may return NULL() 2351 .resolveVariable(context, "userBean")) { 2352 Object requestObject = context.getApplication() 2353 .getVariableResolver().resolveVariable(context, 2354 "userBean");

Though I am checking the all null reference condition still it is giving me. Any suggestion ? Thanks in advance

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4  
Aahh. Yoda conditionals. Lovely. –  Linus Kleen Jan 12 '11 at 11:09
1  
What does this have to do with security? –  skaffman Jan 12 '11 at 11:09
    
@goreSplatter +1 @Vibhas stackoverflow.com/questions/2349378/… –  zengr Jan 12 '11 at 11:12
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2 Answers

My guess would be that the report can not determine that

if (null != context.getApplication().getVariableResolver()
                        .resolveVariable(context, "userBean")) 

and

Object requestObject = context.getApplication()
                              .getVariableResolver()
                              .resolveVariable(context, "userBean");

evaluate to the same. Why don't you change the code to

Object requestObject = context.getApplication()
                              .getVariableResolver()
                              .resolveVariable(context, "userBean");
if (requestObject != null)
{
}

And see if that helps.

(And if it doesn't, it will at least get rid of the duplicate calls that are now present for every null check)

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This should solve the problem as in the initial code there is no guarantee that the second resolveVariable() invocation will not return null (the check is only performed against the first invocation). –  Costi Ciudatu Jan 12 '11 at 11:26
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There isn't enough information to tell whether your static inspection tool is providing good advice or not.

If "userBean" is a managed bean, then a null check would be redundant - it will be instantiated by the resolver. However, it would be better to utilize JSF's dependency injection rather than do manual lookups this way.

if(null != FacesContext.getCurrentInstance()) {
        FacesContext context = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
        if ((null != context.getApplication())
                && (null != context.getApplication().getVariableResolver())) {

If this code is going to be invoked during a HTTP request, all these null checks are junk. There isn't a valid state in which FacesContext.getCurrentInstance() returns null. Null applications and resolvers indicate that the lifecycle hasn't been initialized correctly (or is being set up or torn down, in which case it won't be servicing requests). What are you going to do if you can't resolve the bean? If the application enters an invalid state, you should usually just let the code fail.

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