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When a float number needs to be truncated to a certain digit after the floating point, it turns out that it is not easy to be done. For example if the truncating has to be done to second digit after the point, the numbers should be
45.8976 => 45.89, 0.0185 => 0.01
( second digit after the point is not rounded according to the third digit after the point ).
Functions like round(), number_format(), sprintf() round the number and print out
45.8976 => 45.90, 0.0185 => 0.02

I have met two solutions and I am wondering if they are good enough and which one is better to be used

 1. function truncNumber( $number, $prec = 2 )
{
      return bccomp( $number, 0, 10 ) == 0 ? $number : round( $number - pow( 0.1, bcadd(   $prec, 1 ) ) * 5, $prec );
}

 2. function truncNumber($number, $prec = 2 )
{
  return sprintf( "%.".$prec."f", floor( $number*pow( 10, $prec ) )/pow( 10, $prec ) );
}
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hi. where did you get this function from? have they worked correctly for you? which one did you chooose & why ? –  arod Apr 3 '13 at 15:25

5 Answers 5

floor will do as you ask.

floor(45.8976 * 100) / 100;

You won't find a more direct function for this, since it's a kind of odd thing to ask. Normally you'll round mathematically correct. Out of curiosity - What do you need this for?

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2  
Yes, that is probably the best solution to truncate positive float numbers. To work with negative floats, abs() of the number should be taken and the sign added after that.It is a formula coming from the business that if it produces too long float number, all digits after the second should be just ignored, instead of rounded:). –  Dessislava Mitova Jan 14 '11 at 7:58
    
if we already have two digits after floating point, but didn't know about it and try with your code: echo floor(10.04 * 100) / 100; will return 10.03. –  jamapag Jul 31 '12 at 8:50
    
Same as jampag. echo floor(4.60 * 100) / 100; will return 4.59 which is wrong. –  Jimmy Jan 15 at 18:07

this is my solution:

/**
 * @example truncate(-1.49999, 2); // returns -1.49
 * @example truncate(.49999, 3); // returns 0.499
 * @param float $val
 * @param int f
 * @return float
 */
function truncate($val, $f="0")
{
    if(($p = strpos($val, '.')) !== false) {
        $val = floatval(substr($val, 0, $p + 1 + $f));
    }
    return $val;
}
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why abs(), it shouldn't be needed. right? –  hakre Oct 3 '12 at 18:34
    
It's right. I really doesn't remember why I had to add abs() in this this function –  Ragen Dazs Oct 6 '12 at 11:38
    
so having something we don't know if it is necessary or not can not be "the simplest" on my eyes (no offence please, just saying you should probably reword that a little and remove the non-necessary parts from your answer to get better feedback) –  hakre Oct 6 '12 at 11:40
    
I appreciate your feedback, I have commented usless code –  Ragen Dazs Oct 6 '12 at 11:49
1  
commented code is not helpful. you never understand why the code is commented. it's either not needed (then it would be removed) or it is needed (then it wouldn't be commented). It's really bad to have commented code blocks, use version control instead (like on this site, there are revisions of your answer). Also double check your use of the strpos function. your usage looks wrong to me, for example if there is no .. Check with the manual, it's a common error if you do not spot it directly. –  hakre Oct 6 '12 at 11:54

To truncate numbers the "best" is to use (I took a number here that works for my example):

$number = 120,321314;

$truncate_number  = number_format($number , 1); // 120,3
$truncate_number  = number_format($number , 2); // 120,32
$truncate_number  = number_format($number , 3); // 120,321

Hope this help is easy than other answers here, but it is easy only for the cases it works for. Here is a case it does not work for (demo):

$number = 10.046;

echo number_format($number , 2); // 10.05

The number_format function is tricky, you can solve your problem this way (from php.net):

liviu andrei (bls) 18-Nov-2011 12:10 To prevent the rounding that occurs when next digit after last significant decimal is 5 (mentioned by several people below):

function fnumber_format($number, $decimals='', $sep1='', $sep2='') {

    if (($number * pow(10 , $decimals + 1) % 10 ) == 5)
        $number -= pow(10 , -($decimals+1));

    return number_format($number, $decimals, $sep1, $sep2);

}

$t=7.15; echo $t . " | " . number_format($t, 1, '.', ',') . " | " . fnumber_format($t, 1, '.', ',') . "\n\n"; //result is: 7.15 | 7.2 | 7.1

$t=7.3215; echo $t . " | " . number_format($t, 3, '.', ',') . " | " . fnumber_format($t, 3, '.', ',') . "\n\n"; //result is: 7.3215 | 7.322 | 7.321 } ?>

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2  
if $number will be 10.046, your code will return 10.05, not 10.04. –  jamapag Jul 31 '12 at 8:28
    
You are right guys and missed that behaviour but I honestly think the behaviour is strange, I mean "number_format" the name of this function make you think is like formating the display only moving the comma. –  sandino Oct 21 '12 at 6:18

The round() function does have a precision paramter as well as a third parameter for specifying the rounding method, but you're right, it doesn't do truncating.

What you're looking for are the floor() and ceil() functions. The downside is that they don't have a precision parameter, so you'll have to do something like this:

$truncated = floor($value*100)/100;
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I'm seeing another method to perform this:

function trunc($float, $prec = 2) {
    return substr(round($float, $prec+1), 0, -1);
}

But it's not better than any other... round can be replaced with sprintf too.

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