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Suppose:

class Parser
{
  public:
  void parser1(int a, int b, int c);
  void parser2(int d, int e, int f);
  void setupPtr();

  void (Parser::*ptrParser) (int param1, int param2, int param3);
}

Parser::setupPtr()
{
   if(bla bla)
   {
       ptrParser = &Parser::parser1;
   }
   else
   {
       ptrParser = &Parser::parser2;
   }
}

in main:

int main(argv, argc)
{
   Parser parser;
   parser.setupPtr();
// first case
   parser.ptrParser(some paramps); // error!    error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 3 arguments
// second case
   parser.*ptrParser(some paramps); // error!   'ptrParser' : undeclared identifier
// third case
   (parser.*ptrParser)(some paramps); // error!     'ptrParser' : undeclared identifier


}
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You do realize that all your members in the class are private so you cannot access them from main? –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 12 '11 at 12:17
    
sorry, edit code.. originaly its public –  StNickolay Jan 12 '11 at 12:18
    
What are you really trying to accomplish? It's very possible you don't need function pointers at all. –  Karl Knechtel Jan 12 '11 at 12:35
    
2Karl: I need firstly, to parse some raw data(parseFunc), than according to its type call different getcontentX functions. Parse function gets from 3party C-library. –  StNickolay Jan 12 '11 at 13:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given that you change the ptrParser field to be public, you need to write main this way:

int main()
{
   Parser parser;
   parser.setupPtr();
   (parser .* (parser.ptrParser))(1, 2, 3);
   return 0;
}

Let's try to understand the line.

First, to call a pointer-to-member-function of type void (Parser::*)(int, int, int), given an instance of Parser called inst and a pointer-to-member-function func, the syntax is:

(inst .* func)(x, y, z);

In our case, the instance is named parser and the pointer-to-member-function is stored in the ptrParser field of the parser class that is accessed with the parser.ptrParser syntax. Replacing it in the previous expression, this give us (adding parenthesis because I'm not sure of operator precedence):

(parser .* (parser.ptrParser))(x, y, z);

If instead of a reference or an object we have a pointer to a Parser, the syntax would be:

int main()
{
   Parser *parser = createAndInitializeParser();
   (parser ->* (parser->ptrParser))(1, 2, 3);
   markParserAsNotUsedDestroyIfNeeded(parser);
   return 0;
}
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wow! I'm shocked, but this compiled! Now i need to understood what it mean). Thanks! –  StNickolay Jan 12 '11 at 12:28
    
I added some explanation. I hope it is clear enough now. –  Sylvain Defresne Jan 12 '11 at 12:32
    
this not trivial snippet, I didn't see that previously ) –  StNickolay Jan 12 '11 at 12:38
    
I edited my answer multiple times, sorry. –  Sylvain Defresne Jan 12 '11 at 12:39

Great intro/tutorial about function pointers in (almost) all shapes and sizes: http://www.newty.de/fpt/index.html

I believe you are looking for part 3.5.

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+1 for the link ^^ –  neuro Jan 12 '11 at 12:26

I see two problems with this code.

1) ptrParser is not assigned to anything. You need to call Parser::setupPtr first.

2) ptrParser is a method pointer to a method which takes no parameters, meaning in short that you must define it to contain parameters. I think you could still get away with it if you casted it before calling it, but better to keep such things simple.

Declaration for a method pointer for your particular example would be:

  void (Parser::*ptrParser) (int, int, int);
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Scratch #2. Question edited to include parameters. –  Neil Jan 12 '11 at 12:21
    
sorry for bit broken code, i wrote them on fly, and forget params in func-ptr definition. But question is still active. –  StNickolay Jan 12 '11 at 12:25

may I suggest you to make a typedef of your function ptr type :

typedef void (Parser::*funcptr) (int , int , int );

and then create your contener :

class Parser
{
public:
typedef void (Parser::*funcptr) (int , int , int );

void parser1(int a, int b, int c);
void parser2(int d, int e, int f);
void setupPtr();

funcptr firstptr;
}

to set it :

firstptr = &Parser::parser1;

to call it :

Parser foo;
foo.setupPtr;
(foo.*(foo.firstptr))(1, 2, 3);

It's less difficult to understand, and you will be able to create funcptr array...

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