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Are there any other characters except A-Za-z0-9 that can be used to shorten links without getting into trouble... :) I was thinking about +,;- or something.

Is there a defined Standard on what characters can be used in a url that browser vendors respect?

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2 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

A path segment (the parts in a path separated by /) in an absolute URI path can contain zero or more of pchar that is defined as follows:

  pchar       = unreserved / pct-encoded / sub-delims / ":" / "@"
  pct-encoded = "%" HEXDIG HEXDIG
  unreserved  = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~"
  sub-delims  = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")"
              / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

So it’s basically AZ, az, 09, -, ., _, ~, !, $, &, ', (, ), *, +, ,, ;, =, :, @, as well as % that must be followed by two hexadecimal digits. Any other character/byte needs to be encoded using the percent-encoding.

Although these are 79 characters in total that can be used in a path segment literally, some user agents do encode some of these characters as well (e.g. %7E instead of ~). That’s why many use just the 62 alphanumeric characters (i.e. AZ, az, 09) or the Base 64 Encoding with URL and Filename Safe Alphabet (i.e. AZ, az, 09, -, _).

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@Joey: Not in a path segment as it’s the path segment delimiter. –  Gumbo Jan 12 '11 at 14:19
    
Ok, I was kinda assuming the OP was talking about the whole path of an URI, not only a single segment. At least, URI shorteners usually work in the way of http://domain.foo/<shortenedpart> where it doesn't need to be restricted to a single sement. –  Јοеу Jan 12 '11 at 14:24
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According to RFC 3986 the valid characters for the path component are:

a-z A-Z 0-9 . - _ ~ ! $ & ' ( ) * + , ; = : @

as well as percent-encoded characters and of course, the slash /.

Keep in mind, though, that many applications (not necessarily browsers) that attempt to parse URIs to make them clickable, for example, may support a much smaller set of characters. This is akin to parsing e-mail addresses where most attempts also don't catch all addresses allowed by the standard.

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So edit the answer. –  Јοеу Nov 14 '11 at 2:22
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