Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a C++ function, that I want to expose to C# for consumption. The catch is that the C++ code declaration is wrapped in namespace:

namespace OhYeahNameSpace
{
 extern "C"  __declspec(dllexport) void Dummy();
}

My question is, how to define the corresponding C# structure? I believe that C# code must be made aware of the existence of OhYeahNameSpace, am I right?

Edit: I think a lot of people misunderstand my point ( no thanks due to a typo in my original example; fixed). I am asking about how to go by if there is a namespace for which the exported function is dwell on. One answer are missing on this part, another one says this can't be done and ask me to wrap it around, and another one is now currently with -1 vote.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for "OhYeahNameSpace." –  Maxpm Jan 12 '11 at 15:26

3 Answers 3

Why not wrap in C++/CLI?

//ohyeah.h
namespace OhYeahNameSpace
{
  public ref class MyClass
  {
     void Dummy();
  }
}

//ohyeah.cpp
#include "ohyeah.h"
namespace OhYeahNameSpace
{
void MyClass::Dummy()
{
// call the real dummy in the DLL
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
I can, but the most important thing is, how to call it from C# ( not another C++)? –  Graviton Jan 12 '11 at 15:04
    
This IS the correct answer. P/Invoke should only be used to call functions with a "C" interface, which means extern "C" to prevent name mangling, and also restrictions on parameter and return types. –  Ben Voigt Jan 13 '11 at 3:02
1  
@Ben, note that for this answer, the Namespace simply doesn't enter into the C# code ( and there is no C# code), I am hard pressed to believe that this could be the answer. –  Graviton Jan 13 '11 at 13:52
    
I think it would help Graviton to understand this answer if you could also could demonstrate how C# calls the C++/CLI wrapper. –  Ken Bloom Jan 13 '11 at 14:12
    
@Graviton Add a reference to the DLL containing the C++/CLI wrappers. After that you can do this in C#: OhYeahNameSpace.MyClass obj = new OhYeahNameSpace.MyClass(); obj.Dummy(); So you use it like you would use any other C# class –  ds27680 Jan 13 '11 at 15:24

Wrap as C and use P/Invoke:

--- OhYeahNameSpace_C.h ---
#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

void _declspec(dllexport) OhYeahNameSpace_Dummy();

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

--- OhYeahNameSpace_C.c ---
#include "OhYeahNameSpace_C.h"
#include <OhYeahNameSpace.h>

void OhYeahNameSpace_Dummy()
{
  ::OhYeahNameSpace::Dummy();
}

The example isn't 100% complete, but you get the gist of it.

share|improve this answer

One possible solution would be to use P/Invoke (besides the already mentioned one wrapping in a C++/CLI class

in C++ (I assume your function is in a project resulting in a DLL named UnmanagedCpp.dll:

namespace OhYeahNameSpace
{
   extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) void Dummy(); //extern "C" to disable name mangling
}

in C#:

 class Program
 {
       [DllImport("UnmanagedCpp.dll")]
       public static extern void Dummy();

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            Dummy();
        }
 }

The C# app should be able to find the UnmanagedCpp.dll (i.e. you can copy it in the bin of the exe)

EDIT:

This solution has some downsides that should be considered. Following the comments, some things I did not state clearly when proposing my "solution".

  1. Wrapping in C++/CLI is the preferable solution.
  2. Currently the VS 2010 compiler (and its predecessors) disable name mangling of functions in namespaces if the function is exported with extern "C". However this is considered to be a bug and this means it could be fixed sometime in the future. I will not hold my breath until they do... The bug one of the commenters provided a link to is reported in 2005 and 5 years later... Besides the current behavior is more like a feature IMHO. If one wants the name properly decorated ( also with the namespace name ) then one should't declare it extern "C". But that's only my personal opinion. So take this in consideration.
share|improve this answer
    
@ds27680, as far as I can see the OhYeahNameSpace is not specified in C#, so how on earth does C# knows where to look for the Dummy function? –  Graviton Jan 13 '11 at 1:51
1  
This won't work. The name of the function in the DLL export table is not Dummy or any of the simple variations that p/invoke knows how to handle. You could look up the mangled name and use it in the DllImport attribute, but that's subject to breakage any time the C++ DLL gets recompiled. –  Ben Voigt Jan 13 '11 at 3:04
    
Shouldn't this bug report apply to your solution? –  Ken Bloom Jan 13 '11 at 3:06
    
@Ben Voigt Well it works with VS 2010... With extern "C" the function name is not mangled (even though it is in a namespace). I consiedered that one has control over the C++ code. –  ds27680 Jan 13 '11 at 8:32
    
@Ken Bloom. Yes I guess you are right the bug report applies to my solution. So I guess it is not a good idea to use this "feature" (read bug) since the bug might be fixed sometime in the future –  ds27680 Jan 13 '11 at 8:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.