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For inheritance purposes I would like to have the following class, which I cannot write myself, available:

class Wrapper<G> : G
{
    public Wrapper(G base);
    protected G GetBase();
}

It would inherit all members of G as asual, and all usages of these members would be redirected to the G supplied during construction.

Would it be technically possible to add this functionality to a language like C#?

The main usecase that I would like to use this for is:

    class Wrapper<G> : G
    {
        public Wrapper(G g);
    }

    class IGraphNode<G> where G : IGraphNode<G>
    {
        IEnumerable<G> ForwardNodes();
        IEnumerable<G> BackwardNodes();
    }

    //Reverses the direction of the graph.
    class Reverse<G> : Wrapper<G> where G : IGraphNode<G>
    {
        public Reverse(G g)
            : base(g)
        { }

        IEnumerable<G> ForwardNodes()
        {
            return base.BackwardNodes();
        }

        IEnumerable<G> BackwardNodes()
        {
            return base.ForwardNodes();
        }
    }
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2  
Why do you need this? –  mdm Jan 12 '11 at 14:37
2  
Do you have more concrete example of what G is and what Wrapper needs to do? –  epitka Jan 12 '11 at 14:39
2  
What's wrong with regular inheritance? The kind that's already implemented? –  Cody Gray Jan 12 '11 at 14:39
2  
'extends' ? by c#, do you mean java? –  Bala R Jan 12 '11 at 14:40
    
I beliece he wants to extend the functionality of objects of type G. But isn't that exactly what extensions are used for in .Net. See my example below. –  Tomas Jansson Jan 12 '11 at 14:52

4 Answers 4

Not sure if that is what you want but you can use DynamicProxy to create wrapper objects at run-time and intercept method and property calls as needed.

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I think this exists in Ruby, forget what it is called. This is not supported in C#. Would it be possible to add this functionality in C#? Sure, if you can convince the .Net and C# teams to implement this... but I doubt they would.

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1  
In C++ it’s called CRTP (curiously recurring template pattern). In Ruby it’s maybe also referred to as “mixin” although that’s technically something else but CRTP is sometimes used to implement mixins in C++. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 12 '11 at 14:42
    
@Konrad: interesting. I think its the delegator pattern in Ruby. –  Szymon Rozga Jan 12 '11 at 14:43

Isn't that what extensions are used for?

public static class MyStringExtensions
{
    public static string Add1ToString(this string myString)
    {
        myString += "1";
        return myString;
    }
}

In someother class you can now use the following:

using YourNamespaceOfTheExtensionMethods;

public class OtherClass
{
    public string DoSomething()
    {
        string someString = "Hello";
        return someString.Add1ToString();
    }
}

I used string as example but you can extend Object if you want that.

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I believe he wants all calls to the methods of MyClassA on GenericExtensions<T> to call the MyClassA instance's methods. If that makes sense... :) –  Szymon Rozga Jan 12 '11 at 14:46
    
I noticed that exactly after I posted the answer :) –  Tomas Jansson Jan 12 '11 at 14:47
    
Removed the first answer since I think he just could be using extensions. –  Tomas Jansson Jan 12 '11 at 14:59

You could probably do this with reflection. But what exactly is your goal? To decorate a class, or create tools that do stuff with it? Extending an existing instance of a class in the way you want to seems risky, because you would not be creating a new instance of the base class, and code that uses the object would be unaware of this. That is, properties could change either just the new object, or some other object that it extends, and the exact functionality would be unknown from the syntax.

I would think it a lot more transparent (generally) to just do, e.g.

class Wrapper<G> where G: SomeType
{
    public G Base;
    public Wrapper(G g) {
        Base = g;
    }

    // methods to do stuff with object supplied at construction
}

You could do this without the where but I can't think of many reasons why you wouldn't care what the base type is.

If you actually want to make a new class that has new properties, and inherits the data from an existing class, I think you might be trying too hard, because that doesn't really make sense: the two objects would be no longer bound in a sensible way. That is, changes to properties of the base class would affect a different object than changes to your extension properties. Which is exactly what would happen if you had properties in MyWrapper.Base in this example, but it seems more conceptually sensible to maintain the object reference to the base separately if this is actually your goal. Otherwise, clients using your extension object would not understand this and you could easily end up having no idea why your code wasn't working right...

If you want to create a new object that extends something, and copies the properties of an existing object in some transparent way, then do something like this:

class Wrapper<G>: G
{
    public Wrapper(G g) {
        // add memberwise copy function
    }
    .. more properties
}

Wrapper<SomeType> newWrapper = Wrapper<SomeType>(someOtherObject);

.. like how you can create a new List from an existing one.

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I think what he wants is extension methods. My guess is that he want to "add" some functionality to an already existing class, and that is what extension methods is for. –  Tomas Jansson Jan 12 '11 at 15:33
    
Think you might be right. Though, I still feel like there's some ulterior motive in mind, since if working with your own objects, why not just include those methods in the core design, or use base classes and inheritance to create different purposed versions of the object? But yeah, if his goal is just to decorate someone else's stuff, that would be the way. Somehow though my gut says he wants to add properties, not just methods. –  Jamie Treworgy Jan 12 '11 at 15:41

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