Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for standards that are behind realtime web applications. I know about W3C Websockets API and IETF Websockets protocol, Bayeux protocol and Server-Sent Events standards. Are there any other standards for techniques like long-polling, callback-polling, Iframe streaming, htmlfile streaming, XHR streaming, multipart streaming, Direct Socket?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe this can help you out: w3viewer.com –  Šime Vidas Jan 12 '11 at 15:12

3 Answers 3

I have found an interesting answer on quora (http://www.quora.com/What-are-the-standards-behind-realtime-web) :

The following protocols are core to the Realtime Web:

  1. HTTP protocol in general makes so much possible WebSockets protocol
  2. PubSubHubbub protocol
  3. Webhooks eXtensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) & BOSH (http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0...)
  4. Activity Streams (as pointed out by Chris Saad)
  5. http-live-streaming / HTTP Long-Polling
share|improve this answer

If anyone is interested in a Java implementation I just wrote a sample app and a blog post about it. It uses Java, Maven, Comet, Bayeux, Spring. http://jaye.felipera.cloudbees.net/ http://geeks.aretotally.in/thinking-in-reverse-not-taking-orders-from-yo

share|improve this answer

Long polling doesn't have a dedicated standard. It is effectively an implementation technique layered on top of existing standards like HTTP and XMLHttpRequest (which is standardized as W3C working drafts). The Wikipedia page is a pretty good reference.

XMPP standardizes a technique called BOSH which is also implemented as long-lived HTTP.

multipart/x-mixed-replace was implemented by Netscape but not IE, and is not a standard. The Push technology Wikipedia page is a good reference.

Hope these help.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.