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So my understanding is that JARs can have a hierarchy of files and folders. So if I want to JAR up the following file structure:

someDir/
    anotherDir/
        yetAnotherDir/
            widget.java
            foo.java
    someFile.jpg
    anotherFile.qfx

The convention I'm using is the Linux forward-slash ("/"). On Windows it would be a backwards slash ("\") to demarcate file paths.

Is it that Java JARs up file hierarchies into a uniform, platform-independent structure, so that the same JAR can be run off a Windows and Linux machine alike? Or do JARs prefer a particular schema (Windows or Linux) for file paths and use that under the hood?

Thanks!

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AFAK Jar is almost the same as Zip. If I'me not mistaken it's exactly Zip. So that's why it's platform independent. I've even tried unzipping and zipping a jar again and it works. –  Auxiliary Jan 12 '11 at 15:12
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is it that Java JARs up file hierarchies into a uniform, platform-independent structure, so that the same JAR can be run off a Windows and Linux machine alike?

Yes.

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The same jar can run in both Windows and Linux based systems. The difference in the folder separator has nothing to do with it. Actually Windows understand both forward and backwards slash as a separator.

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It just seemed to be an answer instead of a comment!

AFAK Jar is almost the same as Zip. If I'm not mistaken it's exactly based on Zip. So that's why it's platform independent. I've even tried unzipping and zipping a jar again and it works.

Software developers generally use .jar files to distribute Java applications or libraries, in the form of Java class files and associated metadata and resources (text, images, etc.). JAR files build on the ZIP file format. - See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAR_(file_format)

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