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Why would anyone use String.Format in C# and VB .NET as opposed to the concatenation operators (& in VB, and + in C#)?

What is the main difference? Why are everyone so interested in using String.Format? I am very curious.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Adi Lester, Niels Keurentjes, atk, c4p May 15 '13 at 3:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
related: stackoverflow.com/questions/16432/… –  Nate Kohl Jan 12 '11 at 17:06
1  
Because the one who thought + operator is evil and always use string.Format is wrong. –  Danny Chen Jan 12 '11 at 17:06
    
See also my accepted answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3019508/c-string-formatting/… –  Mark Rushakoff Jan 12 '11 at 17:14

8 Answers 8

up vote 107 down vote accepted

I can see a number of reasons:

Readability

string s = string.Format("Hey, {0} it is the {1}st day of {2}.  I feel {3}!", _name, _day, _month, _feeling);

vs:

string s = "Hey," + _name + " it is the " + _day + "st day of " + _month + ".  I feel " + feeling + "!";

Format Specifiers (and this includes the fact you can write custom formatters)

string s = string.Format("Invoice number: {0:0000}", _invoiceNum);

vs:

string s = "Invoice Number = " + ("0000" + _invoiceNum).Substr(..... /*can't even be bothered to type it*/)

String Template Persistence

What if I want to store string templates in the database? With string formatting:

_id         _translation
  1         Welcome {0} to {1}.  Today is {2}.
  2         You have {0} products in your basket.
  3         Thank-you for your order.  Your {0} will arrive in {1} working days.

vs:

_id         _translation
  1         Welcome
  2         to
  3         .  Today is
  4         . 
  5         You have
  6         products in your basket.
  7         Someone
  8         just shoot
  9         the developer.
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2  
That first example is the big win for me. –  Dan Tao Jan 12 '11 at 17:09
2  
I don't think the separation of concerns provided by removing string templates from your code should be under-estimated. If some bad wording becomes an issue, this can mean the difference between a simple config change or database update, and a full blown emergency change. –  SamStephens Jan 12 '11 at 17:19
36  
+1 for the Someone just shoot the developer. ;-) –  Tim Schmelter Jan 12 '11 at 17:20
6  
For your 'substr' example you should actually use _invoiceNum.ToString("00000"). ToString supports the same composite formatting settings as string.Format() When you have just a single value to be formatted ToString() is often simpler/clearer than Format(). –  Ash Jan 17 '11 at 1:40
10  
I don't know about you, but I read the one without formatting better. Especially when I want to know what goes where, I have to go back and forth between the text and the params, and that's not even counting the possibility of miscounting and getting it wrong (that may not be an issue with fewer parameters, but go over 10 and it stops being fun). As Ashley pointed out, the second point is null if you use the formatting built in the ToString method. I agree with the third one, but I don't think I'll ever use it outside of that particular case. –  Yandros Oct 17 '11 at 18:38

Besides being a bit easier to read and adding a few more operators, it's also beneficial if your application is internationalized. A lot of times the variables are numbers or key words which will be in a different order for different languages. By using String.Format, your code can remain unchanged while different strings will go into resource files. So, the code would end up being

String.Format(resource.GetString("MyResourceString"), str1, str2, str3);

While your resource strings end up being

English: "blah blah {0} blah blah {1} blah {2}"

Russian: "{0} blet blet blet {2} blet {1}"

Where Russian may have different rules on how things get addressed so the order is different or sentence structure is different.

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+1 I had never considered String.Format's application to localisation until I saw this. –  Pharap Jul 26 at 21:43

First, I find

string s = String.Format(
    "Your order {0} will be delivered on {1:yyyy-MM-dd}. Your total cost is {2:C}.",
    orderNumber,
    orderDeliveryDate,
    orderCost
);

far easier to read, write and maintain than

string s = "Your order " +
           orderNumber.ToString() +
           " will be delivered on " +
           orderDeliveryDate.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") +
           "." +
           "Your total cost is " +
           orderCost.ToString("C") + 
           ".";

Look how much more maintainable the following is

string s = String.Format(
    "Year = {0:yyyy}, Month = {0:MM}, Day = {0:dd}",
    date
);

over the alternative where you'd have to repeat date three times.

Second, the format specifiers that String.Format provides give you great flexibility over the output of the string in a way that is easier to read, write and maintain than just using plain old concatenation. Additionally, it's easier to get culture concerns right with String.Format.

Third, when performance does matter, String.Format will outperform concatenation. Behind the scenes it uses a StringBuilder and avoids the Schlemiel the Painter problem.

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Just a note: There is no Schlemiel the Painter problem with repeated +s in a line. They are compiled to a single string.Concat call. –  Porges Mar 1 '11 at 21:46

Several reasons:

  1. String.Format() is very powerful. You can use format providers and simple format indicators (like fixed width) right in the format string.
  2. You can do some powerful things by putting format strings in configuration files.
  3. String.Format() is often faster, as it uses a StringBuilder and an efficient state machine behind the scenes, whereas string concatenation in .Net is relatively slow. This is especially true as the size of the string and number of substituted values increases.
  4. String.Format() is actually more familiar to many programmers, especially those coming from a background that uses a variant of the old C printf() function.

Finally, don't forget StringBuilder.AppendFormat(). String.Format() actually uses this method behind the scenes, and going to the StringBuilder directly can give you a kind of hybrid approach: explicitly use .Append() (analogous to concatenation) for some parts of a large string, and use .AppendFormat() in others.

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1  
string.Format usually won't be faster than a few string concatenations, because the format string also needs to be parsed and copied. –  0xA3 Jan 12 '11 at 17:16
    
@0xA3 - Updated the post to reflect this somewhat. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 12 '11 at 17:19
    
Thanks for the update. In fact, there is another caveat with string.Format as compared to concatenation + ToString(): value types are boxed as described here: jeffbarnes.net/blog/post/2006/08/08/…. Nonetheless, string.Format is a very powerful and great tool and performance usually not the most important criteria. –  0xA3 Jan 12 '11 at 17:26
3  
In reference to #3: String builder is not faster than concatenation. The myth that it is is supported by "tests" that actually do concatenation on different lines (or in a loop). When all concatenation is done on a single line, the compiler translates it into a string.append(paramaarray) call, which is the most efficient out of all options. During a string.append call, the exact size of the destination string is known ahead of time and can be allocated immediately and each character copied only once. –  csauve Jan 12 '11 at 17:44

String.Format adds many options in addition to the concatenation operators, including the ability to specify the specific format of each item added into the string.

For details on what is possible, I'd recommend reading the section on MSDN titled Composite Formatting. It explains the advantage of String.Format (as well as xxx.WriteLine and other methods that support composite formatting) over normal concatenation operators.

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There's interesting stuff on the performance aspects in this question

However I personally would still recommend string.Format unless performance is critical for readability reasons.

string.Format("{0}: {1}", key, value);

Is more readable than

key + ": " + value

For instance. Also provides a nice separation of concerns. Means you can have

string.Format(GetConfigValue("KeyValueFormat"), key, value);

And then changing your key value format from "{0}: {1}" to "{0} - {1}" becomes a config change rather than a code change.

string.Format also has a bunch of format provision built into it, integers, date formatting, etc.

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If you're interested in the performance aspect, you might find this other question interesting: stackoverflow.com/questions/761121/… –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 12 '11 at 17:18

Think it this way:

The Console.WriteLine method is so useful since it allows you to define almost any formatted string. It uses String.Format behind the lines.

Hope you can better visualise the advantages.

Hope it helps.

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It is not preferable to wright the string like 'string +"Value"+ string' because of Localization. In case of localization we need the string as well formatted. So that string.Format is required.

For example we need to show the following error in different languages:

MessageBox.Show(String.Format(ErrorManager.GetError("PIDV001").Description, proposalvalue.ProposalSource)

where

'ErrorCollector.GetError("ERR001").ErrorDescription' returns a string like "Your ID {0} is not valid". This message must be localized in many languages. In that case we can't use + in C#. We need to follow string.format.

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