Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a ColumnSeries with data bound to it and it displays correctly. When a column is right-clicked, I want to figure out what the independent-axis (X) value is. Ideally, I want to display a context menu with that information.

I have a MouseRightButtonDown handler, but cannot figure out how to perform the hit test to get the X-axis information.

I have selection enabled, but do not want to have to select a column prior to right-click.

Any help would be appreciated!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can walk up the visual tree looking for a ColumnDataPoint.

Here's a sample graph:

<Grid MouseLeftButtonDown="Grid_MouseLeftButtonDown">
    <Grid.Resources>
        <PointCollection x:Key="sampleData">
            <Point X="1" Y="6"/>
            <Point X="2" Y="4"/>
            <Point X="3" Y="8"/>
        </PointCollection>
    </Grid.Resources>
    <chartingToolkit:Chart Title="Chart Title">
        <chartingToolkit:ColumnSeries Name="chart1" Title="Column Series" ItemsSource="{StaticResource sampleData}" IndependentValueBinding="{Binding X}" DependentValueBinding="{Binding Y}"/>
    </chartingToolkit:Chart>
</Grid>

and with this code-behind:

private void Grid_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    var element = Mouse.DirectlyOver as DependencyObject;
    while (element != null && !(element is ColumnDataPoint))
    {
        element = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(element);
    }
    if (element != null)
    {
        var columnDataPoint = element as ColumnDataPoint;
        Debug.WriteLine("X = " + columnDataPoint.IndependentValue);
        Debug.WriteLine("Y = " + columnDataPoint.DependentValue);
    }
}

the X and Y values for the item the mouse is over will be printed out when the left mouse button is clicked.

share|improve this answer
    
That looked a little complicated and made me feel dirty :) I kept poking around in the debugger and found something that looked good. Then I noticed it looked a little like some of what you have. Here it is shorter and sweeter, but I am not sure it is as elegant as it should be.... –  GTAE86 Jan 13 '11 at 17:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is the example code that works.

MainWindow.xaml:

<Window x:Class="ColumnSeriesApp.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
            xmlns:chartingToolkit="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Controls.DataVisualization.Charting;assembly=System.Windows.Controls.DataVisualization.Toolkit"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:ColumnSeriesApp"
      Title="Pet Data" Height="350" Width="525">

MainWindow.xaml.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows.Documents;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Navigation;
using System.Windows.Shapes;

namespace ColumnSeriesApp
{
/// <summary>
/// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
/// </summary>
public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public PetData m_PetData;
    public MainWindow()
    {
        m_PetData = new PetData();
        DataContext = m_PetData;
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void m_colserHistogram_MouseRightButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        // Figure out what column we are on and display a popup menu based on the information.
        IInputElement ieMouseOver = e.MouseDevice.DirectlyOver;
        Rectangle rMouseOver = (Rectangle)ieMouseOver;
        string strMouseOverContext= rMouseOver.DataContext.ToString();
        string strMouseOverKey= "";
        foreach (var vKvP in m_PetData)
        {
            if (1 == strMouseOverContext.IndexOf(vKvP.Key))
                strMouseOverKey = vKvP.Key;
        }

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(strMouseOverKey))
            MessageBox.Show("The X value is " + strMouseOverKey);
    }
}

public class PetData : Dictionary<string, int>
{
    public PetData()
    {
        Add("SallyBeagle", 7);
        Add("Cujo", 10);
        Add("DobyDeedle", 11);
        Add("Caramel", 6);
        Add("Boo", 6);
    }
}
}

It seems to work pretty well. If Rick had not come back with an idea, I would probably have quit looking for awhile - thanks for the motivation!

Now - is this solution all MVVM and whatnot? It still feels a little like a hack....

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.