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What I'm trying to do is read the value for all the nodes in this XML and put them into an array. This should be simple but for some reason it's driving me nuts.

XML

<ArrayOfAddress>
<Address>
<AddressId>297424fe-cfff-4ee1-8faa-162971d2645f</AddressId>
<FirstName>George</FirstName>
<LastName>Washington</LastName>
<Address1>123 Main St</Address1>
<Address2>Apt #611</Address2>
<City>New York</City>
<State>NY</State>
<PostalCode>10110</PostalCode>
<CountryCode>US</CountryCode>
<EmailAddress>test@test.com</EmailAddress>
<PhoneNumber>5555551234</PhoneNumber>
<AddressType>CustomerAddress</AddressType>
</Address>
</ArrayOfAddress>

Code

class MassageRepsone
def parse_resp
    @@get_address.url_builder #URL passed through HTTPClient - @@resp is the xml above
      doc = Nokogiri::XML::Reader(@@resp)
      @@values = doc.each do |node|
         node.value
    end
end

    @@get_address.parse_resp
    obj = [@@values] 
    Array(obj)
    p obj
end

The code snippet from above returns the following:

297424fe-cfff-4ee1-8faa-162971d2645f


George


Washington


123 Main St


Apt #622


New York


NY


10110


US


test.test.com


5555551234


CustomerAddress

I tried putting @@values to a string and applying chomp but that just prints the newlines as nil and puts quotes around the values. Not sure what the next step is or if I need to approach this differently with Nokogiri.

share|improve this question
    
fix the formatting of your code please. – cam Jan 12 '11 at 20:10
    
Part of the problem is that you don't understand Nokogiri, but you also don't understand what Ruby will do with each either, or understand how to create a collection using each. Also, knowing why you'd want to use each vs. map would help your code. Also, you need to understand when to use @@ vs. @ vs. creating an local variable. – the Tin Man Jan 12 '11 at 21:42
    
Yup I'm learning as I go. The reason for the @@ vs. @ vs. local variables is because I'm creating class variables and instance variables that are used between classes in various files. I'm refining as I go and appreciate all your help Tin Man. – r3nrut Jan 12 '11 at 21:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is that this code...

@@values = doc.each do |node|
  node.value
end

...calls node.value on each node, but then doesn't do anything with the result. Array#each returns the array that was iterated, and that's what you are setting @@values to. But doc.each doesn't have all the nodes in the document.

Perhaps you want:

# Find all text nodes and extract them individually
@values = doc.xpath('//text()').map{ |node| node.text }

It's hard to be sure because you don't explain what the array ought to look like in the end. Perhaps you want:

@addresses = doc.css('Address').map do |address|
  address.xpath( './/text()' ).map{ |node| node.text }
end

...which would give you an array of one array for each <Address> element, filled with the values in that element.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Phrogz the first of the two solutions works perfectly. – r3nrut Jan 12 '11 at 21:42
    
Just what I was looking for! – Bob Feb 11 '11 at 18:57

This is how I'd do what it seems you're asking:

require 'ap'
require 'nokogiri'

xml = <<XML
<ArrayOfAddress>
<Address>
<AddressId>297424fe-cfff-4ee1-8faa-162971d2645f</AddressId>
<FirstName>George</FirstName>
<LastName>Washington</LastName>
<Address1>123 Main St</Address1>
<Address2>Apt #611</Address2>
<City>New York</City>
<State>NY</State>
<PostalCode>10110</PostalCode>
<CountryCode>US</CountryCode>
<EmailAddress>test@test.com</EmailAddress>
<PhoneNumber>5555551234</PhoneNumber>
<AddressType>CustomerAddress</AddressType>
</Address>
</ArrayOfAddress>
XML

doc = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
node_values = doc.search('//Address/*').map do |n|
  n.text
end

ap node_values

Which outputs:

[
    [ 0] "297424fe-cfff-4ee1-8faa-162971d2645f",
    [ 1] "George",
    [ 2] "Washington",
    [ 3] "123 Main St",
    [ 4] "Apt #611",
    [ 5] "New York",
    [ 6] "NY",
    [ 7] "10110",
    [ 8] "US",
    [ 9] "test@test.com",
    [10] "5555551234",
    [11] "CustomerAddress"
]

If you have multiple Address nodes then you'll need to tweak the code a little bit, based on how you want to process things, but it's not hard.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, that's tight. Do you recommend any sites or reading material on using Nokogiri? The site itself is useful but I'd love additional resources for really getting the hang of it. – r3nrut Jan 12 '11 at 21:56
    
Your very best source is the Nokogiri-talk mail-list. The developers monitor it and are very helpful. StackOverflow is an OK resource, but you'll find a lot of bad answers searching for related questions. – the Tin Man Jan 12 '11 at 21:58
2  
And, heh, any "tight"ness is thanks to Ruby. It's a very nice language, especially when coupled with libraries that are written by people who "grok" it. Nokogiri's developers do. You'll find Ruby's elegance starts to shine more and more as you get used to it and begin thinking in "the Ruby way". – the Tin Man Jan 12 '11 at 22:00

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