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If I need to select 10-th parent, is there a cleaner way, then repeating .parent() 10 times?

$('#element_id').parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent();
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8  
$('#element_id').greatgreatgreatgreatgreatgreatgreatgreatgrandparent()? –  Larry Lustig Jan 12 '11 at 20:32
    
@Larry: Very nice. How did jQuery overlook that for their API? ;o) –  user113716 Jan 12 '11 at 22:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you truly need to get the 10th parent, and you are unable to use a selector to get there, the smoothest way would probably be something like this:

$('#element_id').parents().eq(9);
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If there's a selector that represents the target you're after, then use .closest() or .parents().

$('#element_id').closest('.someClass');
$('#element_id').parents('.someClass:first');

...but both of these will return the first match found. The proper solution will depend on your actual HTML markup.

(Note that .closest() also evaluates the original element, while parents() starts with the first ancestor.)

Also keep in mind that browsers make HTML corrections. So if you're traversing from inside a <table> that has no <tbody> to an element outside the <table>, doing x number of .parent() may give different results in different browsers.

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6  
This is the way to do it. parent() ten times requires too much knowledge of the DOM structure, which could change. Applying a class to the node you're looking for is much safer. –  Juan Mendes Jan 12 '11 at 20:13
    
Thanks, this is really great, but does not answer the question as it is. What if this 10-th parent does not have a class or id? –  Silver Light Jan 13 '11 at 16:25
    
@Silver Light: You would still use .parents() with a selector. Give it a selector that says "give me the 10th match". Like this: $('#element_id').parents(':eq(9)'). –  user113716 Jan 13 '11 at 16:38
    
...the main point is that this approach is fragile, and you should first try to define the markup such that you can target an element directly. If you're going up 10 levels, I'd imagine you must have some specific target in mind. Though I understand that there are those cases where it is simply impossible. –  user113716 Jan 13 '11 at 16:44

The following post here uses this implementation:

jQuery.fn.getParent = function(num) {
    var last = this[0];
    for (var i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        if(!last) break; 
        last = last.parentNode;
    }
    return jQuery(last);
};
// usage:
$('#myElement').getParent(3);

so your usage would simply be:

$('#element_id').getParent(10);
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1  
This will cause errors if an element has fewer than num ancestors. –  lonesomeday Jan 12 '11 at 20:16
    
You should break the loop if there's no parentNode on the previous iteration. if(!last) break; last = last.parentNode; (as @lonesomeday noted above) –  user113716 Jan 12 '11 at 20:17
    
@lonesomeday, Good point. Just thought it might be useful to OP or others. –  Rion Williams Jan 12 '11 at 20:17

I've used this code:

var position = $("#test").parents("div").length - 10;
$("#test").closest("div:eq(" + position + ")").append("here!!!");

with that HTML :

    <div>
        <div>
            <div>
                <div>
                    <div>
                        <div>
                            <div>
                                <div>
                                    <div>
                                        <div>
                                            <div>
                                                <span id="test">here</span>
                                            </div>
                                        </div>      
                                    </div>
                                </div>
                            </div>
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

Yes that is 11 div. so running the code should stop at the 10th div and append here!!!

I'm sure this code could be even more clean.

No need to add class.

Edit: I used 11 DIV so you can see it's not going to the very first one, it actually stop at the 10th.

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