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Lets look at the typical web application scenario

  1. User clicks 'create TEST application' button initiating a get request for TEST application form (in this case .aspx)
  2. Prior to loading the TEST form

    a. Service Layer requests the TEST Application Factory to create a domain object
    b. Factory initializes an application # and other nested objects
    c. Factory returns the domain object
    d. Service takes help of an Assembler to create a DTO and return to the Presentation Layer

  3. User fills in the data and submits the TEST Application form
  4. Presentation Layer creates a DTO and sends it across to service layer

Questions

  1. How should the system construct the domain object from dto after user submits the data back for validation?
  2. Should we use a factory or let the mapper/assembler construct the Domain object from DTO?
  3. If we use mapper to construct the domain object from dto then it break the factory rule :(
  4. If we use the factory once again wont it recreate a new Application# for the domain object? rehydrate the domain object from DTO using Assembler?
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"If we use mapper to construct the domain object from dto then it break the factory rule :(" - what "factory rule"? –  Jeff Sternal Jan 12 '11 at 20:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How should the system construct the domain object from dto after user submits the data back for validation?

By retrieving it from the Repository/persistent storage.

Should we use a factory or let the mapper/assembler construct the Domain object from DTO?

Neither.

If we use mapper to construct the domain object from dto then it break the factory rule :(

Factory is the wrong thing to use. Factory is responsible for beginning an entity's lifetime. In your described scenario (as I understand it), you already have an entity that exists. It's lifetime has already begun. Retrieve it from your Repository, don't create another one.

If we use the factory once again wont it recreate a new Application# for the domain object?

Probably, which, again, is why Factory is the wrong piece to use here.

I do have a question about your process here. You said:

Prior to loading the TEST form

a. Service Layer requests the TEST Application Factory to create a domain object

b. Factory initializes an application # and other nested objects

c. Factory returns the domain object

d. Service takes help of an Assembler to create a DTO and return to the Presentation Layer

But what that means is that you are creating a domain entity when a user views a page. That seems quite wrong. I guess I have trouble seeing how a request to GET a page should be considered a request to create a domain entity?

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I'm sorry I may have not specified it correctly. –  GeorgeKT Jan 12 '11 at 22:18
    
The scenario I'm talking about is creation of a brand new form say order entry screen. Should we persist the domain object even to start a new order entry on web? and every time I need to perform business rule based validation on the order, I need to retrieve the domain object using repository and re-hydrate it with DTO using assembler and only then can I perform validation and get results ? –  GeorgeKT Jan 12 '11 at 22:23
    
It seems like you shouldn't need the domain entity to display the form that is filled out and submitted. Filling out that form and submitting it should result in the creation of the domain entity. So there should be no need to map the domain entity to a DTO to display. How are you displaying an entity if it doesn't exist yet and the user is just now requesting the view from which they can create it? –  qes Jan 12 '11 at 23:13
    
2nd, it sounds like you've put validation in the wrong place. If you need to update your domain object first, then ask it if it is valid, I would say that is backwards. Also, remember validation occurs in different contexts. When the user submits a form, that should be translated into a command against your domain. To perform that command, you should first take the pertinent info that is part of the command and the entity upon which the command will be performed, and ask if - given that info - it is valid to perform the command. This should happen before modifying the domain entity. –  qes Jan 12 '11 at 23:16
    
Also, that implies validation is orthogonal to the domain entity. It can seem like validation belongs in the entity, but because validation occurs under different contexts it is not (context = is this valid if I am creating a new entity, is this valid if I am performing CommandX or CommandY, etc.) –  qes Jan 12 '11 at 23:18

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