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I'm tasked with writing an Exception Handling Strategy and Guidelines document for a .NET/C# project I'm working on. I'm having a tough go at it. There's plenty of information available for how/when to throw, catch, wrap exceptions, but I'm looking for describing what sorts of things should go on inside the catch block short of wrapping and throwing the exception.

try
{
   DoSomethingNotNice();
}
catch (ExceptionICanHandle ex)
{
   //Looking for examples of what people are doing in catch blocks
   //other than throw or wrapping the exception, and throwing.
}

Thanks in advance

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1  
Have you come up with any ideas at all? –  David Heffernan Jan 12 '11 at 20:50
1  
Rule number 1 of 1: Don't handle exceptions unless you ask me first –  Greg Jan 12 '11 at 20:58
5  
Why are people voting to close this as offtopic? How is this not programming related? What topic fits it better than programming? –  AaronLS Jan 12 '11 at 21:13
    
@Aaron - It's sorta like passing the scene of a car wreck and seeing blood on the windshield. I go "ugh, that poor soul, what can I do about that" and secretly wishing I won't see it again for a while. Imperfect metaphor, here we can vote to alter reality! But yes, the OP has a seriously impossible assignment. Glad it isn't me. I bet you're glad too. –  Hans Passant Jan 12 '11 at 22:09
    
Fail fast may be related enough to mention. –  user166390 Jan 12 '11 at 23:39

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It means exactly that. If you are expecting code you're running to throw an exception, and when that exception is thrown your code knows what went wrong and how to proceed, then catch the exception and handle it.

Basically, the rule exists to prevent anti-patterns like:

try
{
   ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
   throw;
}

The catch here does nothing but add a speed bump to unwinding the call stack. If you don't actually want to anything with the exception you're catching, you shouldn't even bother with the catch.

A related but far more valid case is where you don't care about the exception being thrown, but you need to clean up in all cases. In that case, skip the catch; you don't need it, just make it a try-finally block.

EDIT: To answer the question in the post, not just the subject, you could write a rule as follows: "Do not code a try-catch statement that does not do anything, or only rethrows the caught exception. All catch statements should perform some value-added action relating to the thrown exception."

For example, let's say you are trying to connect to a SQL Server instance using credentials supplied by the user when they log into your app. Dozens of things could go wrong, some of which you can't expect, some of which you should.

  • Server isn't responding - you can try again; perhaps call the connection method recursively in the catch, with a "retry counter" to break the otherwise infinite loop.
  • User failed authentication - show a friendly (or not-so-friendly, but concise and understandable) message in red on the dialog box.
  • User not authorized to connect to the specified DB - Depends on your security setup; in most offices, that's something you should e-mail the DBA about, because it means he created the login but forgot to assign the proper rights.
  • Network not available: You can alert the user through an error on the login dialog or a new dialog, retry a couple times, etc.
  • Division by zero - WTF? What could possibly cause a Div by Zero during a login? You're not expecting this exception, you have no clue what went wrong in this case and therefore can't continue running code, so don't catch it.
  • If anything goes wrong, you may want to log the message to a file or a shared resource for audit/security purposes. This should happen at lower levels if you want to continue execution, or higher levels if you're going to gracefully shut down afterward.

All of these examples involve first catching an exception of a known type and interrogating it to see what exactly went wrong, then performing some known action that can allow the program to continue execution. The object is to prevent the application from crashing and burning when something goes wrong that you know could go wrong, but know how to keep the program running in that case.

The basic rules for catching exceptions:

  1. If you aren't expecting an exception, don't catch one.
  2. If you can't or don't want to continue execution of code after receiving an exception, whether you know it can happen or not, don't catch it.
  3. If you are expecting the exception to occur, and know how to continue executing code when it happens (at least for a while), then catch and perform any special actions you need in order to do so.
  4. NEVER trap exceptions (an empty catch block); that causes applications to fail silently in even more unpredictable ways.
  5. NEVER leave catch-and-rethrow (a catch block with only a rethrow) in production code. They can sometimes be useful when debugging as they allow you to identify specific segments of code that are failing, but in production code they're just a speed bump to throwing out or actually dealing with the exception.
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1  
I think he is asking more for a concrete example of a situation where one can handle an exception. These rules are always written by more experienced individuals who have encountered these situations, and for someone who has never had a situation where they can handle an exception(because usually you avoid them in the first place) then it is hard to imagine. See "There's plenty of information available for how/when to throw, catch, wrap exceptions, but I'm looking for describing what sorts of things should go on inside the catch block short of wrapping and throwing the exception." –  AaronLS Jan 12 '11 at 21:21
    
Yes, AaronLS is correct. Most scenarios I've encountered ultimately end up with me catching the exception, deciding whether to adorn that exception with additional info, replacing the exception to hide sensitive info, or re-throwing the exception and eventually cleaning up in a finally block to try avoid corrupt state. Almost every guideline/best practice I've read says don't use exception handling for normal flow processing. I guess I'm looking for examples where I can attempt to recover/fallback without falling into that gray area of "don't use exception handling to control program flow". –  KyleLib Jan 13 '11 at 20:53
    
You shouldn't architect exception throwing and catching into the "happy path" of your program's execution. Exceptions are just that; a notice that something that doesn't follow your expectations has happened. However, it's not an error until you don't know what to do. That's why exceptions can be caught by your program; it may not be normal but you may still know what to do (which would be something other than letting the runtime or OS terminate your program). See above for some general examples regarding a SQL Server login. None of them are normal, but you can try to continue anyway. –  KeithS Jan 13 '11 at 21:00

I think the basic idea underlying this common piece of advice is to avoid scenarios like this:

try
{
    SomeImportantResource = GetSomeImportantResource();
    SomeOtherImportantResource = GetSomeOtherImportantResource();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    SomeGlobalErrorHandlingMechanism(ex);
}

I've worked with developers who, when confronted with a bug, would simply wrap the offending code in a try/catch block and say, "I fixed the bug." The problem in scenarios like the above example is that by simply catching an exception and not fixing the problem that caused it, you're liable to undermine the solidity of your program. Above, what the catch has done is made us uncertain whether SomeImportantResource and SomeOtherImportantResource were ever initialized properly. It seems likely that there could be code elsewhere in the program that requires for these to be initialized, in which case, we've just introduced a bug by "fixing" a bug.

So I think the standard wisdom is to only try to deal with an exception if you can recover from it in such a way that it does not compromise any other code elsewhere in your program.

Or, better than that: don't catch the exception and make some feeble attempt (or non-attempt) to "handle" it; figure out what caused it and fix that problem. Obviously this is not always possible, but it is possible a lot more often than it should be.

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Consider if you had an application like OneNote that lets you store your files on a shared network drive, but in the event the network is unavailable, then it uses local storage temporarily until the main storage is available.

If your program got an exception while interacting with the files, then you could retry the action with the local storage.

This is an example where you have a specific program behavior you want, and accomplish it by how you handle the exception. Generally, you should try to find a way to accomplish your goal without using exception handling, such as in the above exmple, you could always check to see if the file is available before attempting to operate on it. That way you can just code it as an "if/else" instead of a "try/catch". However, if you did that, there is still always the chance in the above case that someone may lose access to a file in the middle of an operation, such that regardless of whether you checked in advance, you still might get an exception that you can handle gracefully. So you'd probably refactor your else block into a function that is both called from the else and the catch, so that you can gracefully fallback to local storage in either case.

I also often include logging if there is no security issue with what I'm logging, and a rethrow as you mentioned, and my logging includes more descriptive information and context information, maybe some local values, which make debugging easier. I always strive to have log files so detailed that I can determine the cause of a problem without having to reproduce on my machine. I hate hearing programmers make the "I can't reproduce it" excuse. You don't have to reproduce it. If your logging is adequate then there is no need to reproduce it.

When an exception trickles up via rethrow's all the way to your GUI layer, then at that point is where you catch it and do not rethrow it, but instead display a message to the user indicating that an unexpected error occurred, and usually exit the application. You might give them an opportunity to save work, but maybe automatically making a backup of the file being overwritten, as an unhandled exception is something you never coded for, meaning something might be corrupt, and you might be saving a bad file, yet leading the user to believe they are saving their work. This is ultimately the reason many program opt to kill themselves if something unexpected occurs, as from that point on who knows what state the program might be in, and something as simple as saving some rows in a database might have serious consequences and hose alot of data.

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If you can perform an action when you catch an exception that is helpful in some way (such as executing a block of code that will perform the function attempted in the try statement, but does it in a different, but perhaps less efficient way, or simply informing the user that their action couldn't be performed), then you should catch it and do so. If you are simply logging the exception to track down the problem later, then you should rethrow the exception throw; (NOT throw ex;), in case there is another block of code that can handle that type of exception.

It's also acceptable to catch an exception to wrap the caught exception in your own exception that may make more sense to the calling function.

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Some examples:

  1. Log the exception and just carry on
  2. Retry the thing that went wrong
  3. Try another method of doing what you were trying to do

It all depends on what went wrong. The point is, just catching and re-throwing is of no use to anyone.

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Let's say you catch FileNotFoundException. What's the point of this when you can just check for it without using exceptions like this:

if(!File.exists(myFile)) 

There's no reason to catch it and therefore the rule is if you can avoid exceptions do avoid them.

Exceptions really only make sense when considering recovery. So a section of the program throws an exception, can the program recover? You are going to have to throw the exception up to the area that can handle the recovery. If you can't recover, then you have to exit and you might as well log it to a file and exit gracefully.

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If your code can gracefully handle a specific type of exception, catch it and handle it, and then let your code keep going. If not, let the exception propagate up, because it may be caught at a higher level or it may be something really wrong that you shouldn't be catching as it might mask the error.

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You shouldn't catch an exception you can't handle, but you can catch exceptions that you might be able to handle:

try
{
   DoSomethingNotNice();
}
catch (ExceptionIMightBeAbleToHandle ex)
{
   if(iCanHandle(ex))
       thenHandle(ex);
   else
       throw;
}

Note that using throw by itself is supposed to preserve stack trace info.

Typical things you can handle gracefully would be a FileNotFoundException.

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The catch block should teardown anything that may have been opened for use in the try and due to the exception being thrown not closed down properly. Database connections and file access are the ones that usually need closing down (though proper use of a using block can handle this)

Once that has been done you can use throw; to chuck the exception up to the next level

Alternatively you might want to wrap your current exception inside a new exception more relevant to the current method

catch(LowLevelException ex){
     throw new HighLevelException("argh bad things happened!",ex);

}
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1  
Usually deallocation of files and connections should take place in the finally block, not the catch block, or alternatively with a using declaration which essentially uses a finally block for deallocation. –  AaronLS Jan 12 '11 at 21:11
1  
@AaronLS: that depends whether the resources were meant to outlive the lifetime of the calling function (e.g. you're allocating resources in an object's constructor, and the object is meant to provide a facade for dealing with those resources). Then it's appropriate to clean up only in the face of an exception. –  Ken Bloom Jan 14 '11 at 15:40
    
@Ken I was addressing his statement that claimed connections and file access should be closed in the catch block. So are you claiming that closing them in the catch block allow them to outlive the lifetime of the calling function? That would give you pretty inconsistent results whether or not an exception occurred. –  AaronLS Jan 14 '11 at 17:35
    
@AaronLS, I'll answer by way of example. Suppose you create a DualCSVWriter class that opens two files in the constructor, and whenever you pass an array to the CSVWriter.writeRow function, it writes that as a CSV row in both files. (Yes, a kinda bizarre interface, but nevertheless...) suppose one of the files fails to open -- you need to close the other in the constructor, but you don't want to close anything if both succeed. Here, the appropriate place to close the files would be in a catch block. –  Ken Bloom Jan 14 '11 at 17:41
    
@Ken That is possible, but maybe a case for a redesign. Any code following that function that tries to use those files becomes more complicated because it doesn't know who is responsible for closing the files. Your post condition for that function is inconsistent. If you are not closing the files at all in a case of success, that implies you are going to continue to use them after the function returns. Consider if you get an error on one and close it in the catch, then all your code following that function is going to have to conditionally check and reopen if it is closed. –  AaronLS Jan 14 '11 at 19:53

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