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I'd like to make one list from two separate lists of unique items.

There are other similar questions but there didn't seem to be any that concerned doing this problem effectively since the lists are a few million items long.

Totally unrelated: am I the only one who hates how the tags suggestion box covers up the "post your question" button?

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3  
Does the order of items in the lists matter? –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 12 '11 at 21:08
    
no but they're not sorted –  funk-shun Jan 12 '11 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use a set.

>>> first = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> second = [3, 2, 5, 6, 7]
>>> third = list(set(first) | set(second))      # '|' is union
>>> third
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
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How can I do it without using set? –  Dejel Dec 5 '13 at 13:53
    
Hey user225312, do you gain anything by calling set() twice and using union? Instinctively I would just write list(set(first + second)). –  Cawb07 Sep 30 at 22:28
>>> l1 = range(10)
>>> l2 = range(5, 15)
>>> set(l1) | set(l2)
set([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14])
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