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I have the following situation:

public interface IStuffer
{
    public string Foo { get; }
}

public class BaseClass
{
    public static string Foo { get { ... } }
}

public class MyClass : BaseClass, IStuffer
{
}

This won't build because MyClass needs a Foo member. How can I use BaseClass's Foo implementation to satisfy MyClass's requirement for Foo?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's because Foo is a static member of the BaseClass. Just take away the static keyword!

public class BaseClass
{
    public string Foo { get { ... } }
}

Edit: Else if you really want it to stay static, you could use an explicit implementation

public class MyClass : BaseClass, IStuffer
{
    string IStuffer.Foo { get { return BaseClass.Foo; } }
}
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Or, if that is not possible, create a non-static Foo that calls the static Foo to satisfy the requirement. –  Michael Stum Jan 12 '11 at 21:39
4  
+1 As a rule, interfaces cannot be satisfied by static members. –  KeithS Jan 12 '11 at 21:39
    
Thanks. The second example is what I was looking for. Just as a side question, what is the accessibility of Foo in MyClass? –  Simucal Jan 12 '11 at 21:51
    
With explicit implementations, it'll not even appear (i.e. less than private) while working with MyClass types explicitly, but "public" when working with IStuffer declared types. –  Reddog Jan 12 '11 at 21:56
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The problem is that your interface expects a NON-static "string Foo", if you make Foo Non-Static in BaseClass then it will satisfy your Interface :)

Good Luck

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Interfaces cannot support static properties or methods. If you have an interface, all methods of that interface must be instance rather than class scope.

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In two ways:

1. Rename Foo to something else and add a method Foo like this:

public class BaseClass
{
 public static string FormerlyCalledFoo { get { ... } }
 public string Foo { get { ... } }
}

2. If you absolutely must have a static Foo property then you can implement the IStuffer interface as an explicit interface implementation like this:

public class BaseClass : IStuffer
{
 public static string Foo { get { ... } }
 string IStuffer.Foo { get { ... } }
}

If using the latter method, then you have to be aware that you have to cast instances of BaseClass to IStuffer to access the IStuffer.Foo property

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