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I think I have a fundamental misunderstanding here. Why does the test fail?

public static class ObjectExtensions
{
  public static Action To<T>(this T newValue, T oldValue) where T : class
  {
    return () => oldValue = newValue;            
  }
}

public static class Assign
{
  public static T TheValue<T>(T theValue)
  {
    return theValue;
  }
}

public class Tests 
{
  public void Test()
  {
    var a = new TestType { Name = "a" };
    var b = "b";
    Assign.TheValue(b).To(a.Name)();

    Assert.That(a.Name == "b"); //fails (a.Name == "a")
  }
}

public class TestType { public string Name {get;set;} }
share|improve this question
1  
Why would it become "b"? You're just passing a string-ref by value at various points. –  Henk Holterman Jan 12 '11 at 23:27
    
My thinking was this: a ref to "b" (newValue) and a ref to "a" (oldValue) would be supplied to the method To, which would return a lambda for assigning newValue to OldValue. This lambda would be evaluated by the third set of parentheses on the line Assign.TheValue(b).To(a.Name)();. Clearly my understanding is totally wrong. –  Ben Jan 12 '11 at 23:56
2  
Think about what is a variable. "oldValue" is a variable. It has its own storage. It is not an alias for some other variable. The "ref" keyword does make an alias for a variable, and that is precisely why it is illegal to capture a ref variable in a closure; because then you could capture a variable whose lifetime is shorter than the lifetime of the closure. –  Eric Lippert Jan 13 '11 at 0:54
    
Thanks Eric. Your comment helped the penny drop on this one. My comparative lack of experience with lambdas let me down here. –  Ben Jan 13 '11 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It fails because the arguments to To are passed by value.

Just because oldValue is set to "b" doesn't mean that a.Name will be changed at all. In the call To(a.Name), the expression a.Name is evaluated to a string reference, and that reference is passed to the method by value.

That's basic parameter passing in C#. Just using a closure doesn't change that.

What you can do is change the To method like this:

public static Action To<T>(this T newValue, Action<T> setter) where T : class
{
    return () => setter(newValue);
}

then change the call to:

Assign.TheValue(b).To(x => a.Name = x)();
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sure I'm being totally dumb, but I thought the evaluation of the lambda () => oldValue = newValue; would swap the reference to the old with the new value. I think I'm having a mental block here. –  Ben Jan 12 '11 at 23:39
    
Suspect I need to re-read a chapter on parameter passing. Frankly this is embarrassing. –  Ben Jan 12 '11 at 23:43

Put another way,

var a = new TestType { Name = "a" };
Assign.TheValue(b).To(a.Name)();

is equivalent to

Assign.TheValue(b).To("a")();

just like

int x = 5;
Convert.ToDecimal(x);

is equivalent to

Convert.ToDecimal(5);
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