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I understand how Non-repudiation and Integrity are achieved with Digital Signatures, but it's the Authentication that I don't grasp yet.

I'm developing a Client-Server application in C#, that should be capable of Authentication with Digital Certificates and Digital Signatures. I know how to check the validity and integrity of a Signature (with SignedCms.CheckSignature()), but how does this authenticates any of the parts involved?

For example:

  1. The client asks the Server for a Digital Signature,
  2. The client receives the signature and validates it,
  3. If the validation succeeds, continue.

The client could be a victim of a man-in-the middle attack and receive a valid signature in step 2. The validation would succeed, but the client wouldn't be talking to the right server.

What am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're missing trust of the signing certificate.

Consider SSL certificates, they have a signing path to a root CA which is trusted by Windows (or whatever OS). If the MITM presents a self signed cert, or one produced by an untrusted CA then it gets rejected by the browser and a warning is displayed. So a certificate is only trusted if it's issued by a CA that you know, or chains up to one you know.

For self signed certs it becomes more complicated, you need to securely exchange the key fingerprint, serial number or other constant identifier and validate that the signing key is in fact one you expect - one reason why self signed certs generally shouldn't be used for public facing web sites or other services.

So if there's an MITM attack, and the signature from the original machine is stripped, the message changed, and then resigned using an unknown certificate as long as you check the identity of the signing cert against something you trust then you'll reject the resigned message.

(in reality it gets more complicated, but you get the point I hope)

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What if the man in the middle blocks the signature coming from the server, and sends to the client an all new digital signature, with a completely valid certificate issued by a trusted CA? –  Telmo Marques Jan 13 '11 at 0:05
    
That becomes more interesting. In SSL you should check the cert name to ensure it machines the address you are connecting to. You rely on the SSL CAs ensuring they've checked that the certificate is issued to the person who owns that FQDN. And then there are published revocation lists in case that goes wrong. In other scenarios you'd be looking at the machine name, and probably the certificate fingerprint which would change, or validating the entire chain, which would be different if the cert was issued by another CA. Told you I simplified it :) –  blowdart Jan 13 '11 at 0:19
    
If i understood well, the aspects regarding a non-ssl environment imply that the client already has correct information about the server (the fingerprint, for example. I could only tell if it changed if I already had the correct fingerprint stored.) What would happen if it was the first time the client connects to the server, and there's no previous trusted information to compare to? –  Telmo Marques Jan 13 '11 at 0:42
1  
Then you can't know anything at all, which is why you need to get the information out of band. –  blowdart Jan 13 '11 at 3:25

They could only receive a valid signature if the man in the middle possesses the private key with which to sign the request. I think the key thing you may be missing is that altering any aspect of the item which is digitally signed would invalidate the signature. The man in the middle can re-submit the request, but if they change it, the signature validation will fail.

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What if the man in the middle blocks the signature coming from the server, and sends to the client an all new digital signature, with a completely valid certificate issued by a trusted CA? –  Telmo Marques Jan 13 '11 at 0:04
    
When the client tries to use the pre-existing public key to validate the sig, it will fail. If the client accepts a new sig, then of course, all bets are off, so you have to make sure a cert is trustworthy before you accept it using a chain of trust. –  Chris B. Behrens Jan 13 '11 at 0:30

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