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Basically i want to search for the smallest (positive) value from a bunch of values and need a default value to compare to the first one. The naïve assumption would be, they always compare "less than" (except NaNs, but let's not consider those) but I'm not quite sure.

I'm using the float type and I think it can safely be assumed that my target hardware implements a infinity value.

Here's some example code:

auto leastValue = std::numeric_limits<float>::infinity();
for (auto i = something.begin(), e = something.end(); i != e; ++i)
{
  auto value = (*i)->GetValue();
  if (value < leastValue)
  {
    leastValue = value;
  }
}
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4  
You could also just use the first value as your initial value. It'll most likely still work if you put in infinity; I'm just pointing out that you don't actually need to use a special inital value. –  Michael Madsen Jan 13 '11 at 0:33
    
With pulling i out of the loop and adding an additional check for an empty collection, I could. But would'nt that render the question useless? ;) –  kiw Jan 13 '11 at 0:39
    
Use std::min_element and let it worry about stuff like that? –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 13 '11 at 0:39
1  
when you are not searching for the minimum of your sequence, but for the minimum of a function (in the mathematical sense) of your sequence elements, both suggestions are awkward - using the first value means writing the code/call for the function twice, and min_element doesn't work for that. –  etarion Jan 13 '11 at 0:42
    
@kiw: Well, you might just not have considered that possibility - that sort of thing happens more often than one might expect. :) –  Michael Madsen Jan 13 '11 at 0:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For IEEE 754 floats, except NaN and infinity, everything is less than infinity. Chances are you'll have those on your platform. If you're paranoid, check with numeric_limits<float>::is_iec559. If your platform happens to be not conforming, use numeric_limits<float>::max(); if your sequence is nonempty, it will not give you a wrong result.

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I support Michael Madsen comment: You don't need an infinite value for this test,

Store the first value of your bunch in a variable and then start your testing with the second value of the bunch. (and it will even save you one test :P)

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I think this depends on what behaviour you expect if the sequence is empty. If you want infinity your implementation is fine, otherwise you should use the first value.

auto i = something.begin();
auto e = semething.end();
if (i == e)
  throw std::exception("empty sequence");

auto leastValue = (*i)->GetValue();

for (++i; i != e; ++i)
{
  auto value = (*i)->GetValue();
  if (value < leastValue)
  {
    leastValue = value;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Infinity is in fact the right answer if the sequence is empty. It can also be the right answer if the sequence is not empty, because not all elementy do yield a value (which was not in my example code). –  kiw Jan 13 '11 at 13:10

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