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The following code does not compile in Visual Studio 2008. How do I get it to allow a unary operator in the Foo1 class that converts it to a Bar, when Foo1 is defined before Bar?

class Foo1
{
public:
    int val;

    operator struct Bar() const;
};

struct Bar
{
    int val;
};

// This does not compile
Foo1::operator Bar() const
{
    Bar x;
    x.val = val;
    return x;
}
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You don't need to have struct Bar, C++'s structs are types already. –  Puppy Jan 13 '11 at 9:18
    
I'm using struct Bar as a forward declaration, since the definition of Bar doesn't appear until later. –  camomilk Jan 13 '11 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured out the answer. There are two solutions:

struct Bar;

class Foo1
{
public:
    int val;

    operator struct Bar() const;
};

Or:

class Foo1
{
    typedef struct Bar MyBar;
public:
    int val;

    operator MyBar() const;
};

(The operator::Bar() implementation remains unchanged)

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It doesn't look like a solution wrt C++, but rather like a workaround for a compiler bug. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 13 '11 at 0:52
    
Yes, you're probably right. I'll add a tag just in case. –  camomilk Jan 13 '11 at 1:21

Or you could:

//forward declaration of Bar
struct Bar;

class Foo1
{
public:
    int val;

    operator Bar() const;
};

struct Bar
{
    int val;
};

//Now it should compile
Foo1::operator Bar() const
{
    Bar x;
    x.val = val;
    return x;
}
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