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My question is slight complicated. Let me try to explain it thoroughly, but if you need more details, feel free to ask me, I will add them.

I learnt recently (by experiment) that if a thread is continuously doing work, something like an integer operation in a while(true) loop, interrupting the thread has no effect on it. Thread goes on like nothing happened.

Now, ThreadPoolExecutors are killed using shutDown() or shutDownNow() methods. I checked the code for these methods, they use interrupt() call to kill a thread. So, if all threads are busy doing stuff, how would an executor be killed? How is it killed, for example when we use it in spring apps.

One such executor will look like:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] a) {
        ExecutorService ex = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(50);
        for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++) {
            ex.execute(new Thread() {
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        File f = File.createTempFile("testfile", "txt");
                        while (true) {
                            f.canRead();
                        }
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    } finally {
                    }
                }
            });
        }

        ex.shutdown();
        ex.shutdownNow();
    }
}
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To answer your main question, it wouldn't be, not unless the JVM was told explicitly to exit via System.exit().

For long running operations which should be interruptable, it is the responsibility of the implementation to check the interrupt flag via Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted().

For example:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] a) {
        ExecutorService ex = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(50);
        for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++) {
            ex.execute(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        File f = File.createTempFile("testfile", "txt");
                        while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
                            f.canRead();
                        }
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    } finally {
                    }
                }
            });
        }

        ex.shutdown();
        ex.shutdownNow();
    }
}

Also note that it is not proper to create an instance of Thread for use solely as a Runnable. Doing so creates a sort of indirection that could confuse more naive programmers.

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ohh, I was not aware of that. Pardon me for my ignorance. Guess, I should read some basic book maybe, Concurrency in practice. Thanks! –  cheekoo Jan 13 '11 at 1:43
1  
@cheekoo, Java Concurrency in Practice is a highly recommended book. Joshua Bloch's Effective Java is another good choice for a bit broader material coverage. –  Tim Bender Jan 13 '11 at 10:31
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You shouldn't be having a infinate loop in your code.

The Thread Pool will does not wait for the threads to exit.

The thread will run forever until the JVM exits

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I agree, this is not an ideal worked thread, but you mean a pool threads like this can NOT be killed in any way? –  cheekoo Jan 13 '11 at 1:41
    
@cheekoo the pool will be killed, but those threads wont. –  The Scrum Meister Jan 13 '11 at 1:42
    
Thanks TSM for your response. This is interesting, I never knew a thread pool can be killed while the threads it is managing are still running. Will try to debug that. I was under impression that threads do stay alive, and so does the pool. –  cheekoo Jan 13 '11 at 1:45
    
@cheekoo by killed i mean that you cannot add anything to the pool. see the #awaitTermination method. –  The Scrum Meister Jan 13 '11 at 1:49
    
@TSM Agreed, just verified, I can't add a new thread to the pool after calling shutdown on it. –  cheekoo Jan 13 '11 at 1:56
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