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I'm not sure why I can't get this to work: A super simple function that just needs to return true or false:

<?php
function check_for_header_images() {
    if ( file_exists('path/to/file') && file_exists('path/to/file'))  
 return true;
}
?>

It will not return true:

<?php
if(check_for_header_images()) {
    // do stuff
}
?>

…doesn't do stuff:

<?php
if(!check_for_header_images()) {
    // do stuff
}
?>

…does do stuff.

The conditions I've set for the function SHOULD return true. If I take that same exact if statement and just do this:

<?php
    if ( file_exists('path/to/file') && file_exists('path/to/file'))  {
        //do stuff
    }
?>

It works. Do I just not understand how to write a function?

share|improve this question
2  
You should use return file_exists('path/to/file') && file_exists('path/to/file'); in your function instead; otherwise, if the condition is false, nothing is returned. I don't know if that's the problem, though. –  Jacob Jan 13 '11 at 3:17
    
Do the file_exists arguments are hard-coded (e.g.: path/to/file) or are they actually variables (e.g.: $foo)? –  netcoder Jan 13 '11 at 3:19
    
If any function is meant to return some value (i.e. not void), make sure it returns something valid in every exit point. Also it's good practice to have a return <default-value> just before the function end. For example, in your case you should have return false as Brad Christie mentioned. –  Amil Waduwawara Jan 13 '11 at 4:12
    
Thanks. All of your answers make perfect sense, and I've tried both methods, and still can't get either to return true when they're supposed to. When I copy the if(file_exists) and use them directly, it works perfectly, but not inside the function. I just don't get it. I must have a typo that I just haven't spotted. netcoder—the arguments were hard-coded. Just for the sake of it, I tried variables as well, and got the same results. Curious where you're going w/ that question… –  Kerri Jan 13 '11 at 18:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
<?php
  function check_for_header_images() {
     if ( file_exists('path/to/file') && file_exists('path/to/file'))  
       return true;
     return false; // missing the default return when it's false
  }
?>

or you could do:

<?php
  function check_for_header_images() {
    return ( file_exists('path/to/file') && file_exists('path/to/file'));
  }
?>

also, the ! in your if statement means opposite. that means if (!false) is true, and if (!true) is false

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Tried both and still can't get it to work! Yes about the '!'… I just included that example to reenforce that it's returning false when it's supposed to be returning true. At this point I can only assume I have some extra character or typo or something in there, but I'm not getting any errors. Grr. –  Kerri Jan 13 '11 at 18:20
    
Marking this as the accepted answer anyway, because I know you're right! –  Kerri Jan 13 '11 at 18:40
    
@Kerri: Are the "/path/to/file" values hard-coded or are they variables? If it's the latter it may be variable scope. For grins, try adding global $path1, $path2; above the if statement and see if it works any better. –  Brad Christie Jan 13 '11 at 18:49

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