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C#, .Net2.0, XP, Zen

I have 2 threads accessing a shared dictionary of structures, each thread via an event. At the beginning of the event I lock the dictionary, remove some structures, and exit the lock+event. Yet somehow the 2nd thread|event is finding some of the removed structures.

Conceptually I must be doing something wrong for this to be happening? I thought locking was supposed to make it thread safe?

share|improve this question
    
Language/platform/framework/state of mind? – leppie Jan 13 '11 at 5:03
1  
C#, .Net2.0, XP, Zen – paIncrease Jan 13 '11 at 5:04
1  
Please provide a short example program that demonstrates this behaviour. – Will Hughes Jan 13 '11 at 5:11
    
Show us some code - ideally, the minimal code that still has the problem. With luck, getting FROM where you are now TO that minimal code will show you what's going wrong... – AakashM Jan 13 '11 at 10:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Two things I can suggest without seeing the code:

  1. Verify that the same lock object is used in both methods, e.g. if your lock statement is locking on a variable that is thread local, it won't work.

object _guard = new object();

void threadMethod1()
{
    lock(_guard) {...} //data is modified inside
}

void threadMethod2()
{
    lock(_guard) {...} //data is modified inside
}

not like this:

void threadMethod1()
{
    lock(new object()) {...} //data is modified inside
}

void threadMethod2()
{
    lock(new object()) {...} //data is modified inside
}

2 Depending on the .NET version you are using, there might be no need for locking if you use BlockingCollection or something from Parallel namespace.

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@Rancur3p1c: cool! Thanks for accepting my answer as one. Any details why it was helpful? – Schultz9999 Jan 18 '11 at 1:02

I don't have reputation to post a comment - otherwise I would.

Locking does work, but here are common pitfalls -

What are you locking? Is it always the same instance of the dictionary? Locking on value types does not work - you just lock the box - then the other thread locks a different box. So this code is bad:

int x;
void SomeThreadedfunc()
{
   lock((object)x) // does not work because x is boxed
   { 
      x++; 
   }
}

However this works:

object lockX = new object();
int x;
void SomeThreadedfunc()
{
   lock(lockX) // works 
   { 
      x++; 
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 The first example is not valid. x will not be boxed - you cannot lock on value types full stop. – Tim Lloyd Jan 13 '11 at 7:41
    
@chibacity - my bad, you are correct you would have to explicitly box it lock((object)x) // does not work because x is boxed { x++; } – Neil Jan 13 '11 at 7:48
    
Hmm... I tend to disagree. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa664735(VS.71).aspx states that "The expression of a lock statement must denote a value of a reference-type." x has to be boxed for compiler to succeed. – Schultz9999 Jan 13 '11 at 9:09
    
@Schultz9999 - you are correct - x gets boxed when you explicitly cast it to object. The problem is each time that boxing happens there is a different instance of the box created and so the locking does nothing. Also I corrected my code after chibacity post. Up to that point it was not valid. – Neil Jan 13 '11 at 13:29
    
@Neil: no argument here - I tried to say it's boxed. I supposed I haven't seen your original post. I was disagreeing with chibacity actually. – Schultz9999 Jan 13 '11 at 16:30

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