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I'm currently implementing a IP-to-country feature for a client in the US. The problem is that when he does some tests by using machines in the US, some of the incoming IPs to his website are identified as Japanese IPs. My log file shows that those IPs start with 150.x.x.x and belongs to JAPAN NETWORK INFORMATION CENTER. He guarantees that when he checked IPs of those machines, they were shown as from the US.

More information: I use request.UserHostAddress (C#) to retrieve client's IP.

So my question is: what is the possible network configuration which can cause this issue?

Thank you in advance.

Edit: How about the situation in which a US user is using internet service of a Japanese company in the US?

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This is more suited Superuser.com. For what it's worth: IP Addresses don't have a nationality and can be redelegated as their owners wish. –  Will Hughes Jan 13 '11 at 5:09
    
What is your actual query? [1]How two sources report same IP (150.X..) to be from two different countries OR [2]Verify your IP acquiring method is correct or not –  Sarwar Erfan Jan 13 '11 at 5:12
    
Hi Hughes, thank you for your comment. That's correct. However, each IP is allocated for a specific country and some client has a need for the IP-to-country feature. –  Thuan Jan 13 '11 at 5:13
    
Nothing to do with programming... –  leppie Jan 13 '11 at 6:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

He guarantees that when he checked IPs of those machines, they were shown as from the US.

Please ask where did he see that information, i.e. how did he geolocated.

I use request.UserHostAddress (C#) to retrieve client's IP

Well, this is the public IP. This can be the IP of the last peer. May be a proxy, a VPN router, (remote) office gateway.

Two most commonly used ways to have IP from different country: 1. Proxy 2. VPN

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Hi Erfan, how about the situation in which a US user is using internet service of a Japanese company in the US? –  Thuan Jan 13 '11 at 6:23
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There are many other possibilities. I included the most common two (proxy, VPN). But, in any case, you get the last IP only. You cannot do anything about this in most cases. For globally distributed offices, VPN is widely used. Also, some people buy dedicated proxy (mostly SOCKS proxy) or VPN just to browse anonymously(!) or to hide real identity (may be to download pirated stuffs?) etc. There is no absolute way. And, if you about a Japanese company, you cannot tell whether their client resides in USA, Afganistan, Japan or North Korea, specially if people can buy the service online –  Sarwar Erfan Jan 13 '11 at 6:30

That field 'returns the fully qualified name of the client or the last proxy that sent the request'. The client's proxy chain might include a host in JP, or they might subscribe to a Japanese ISP.

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I also think of the Japanese ISP case, but I don't know if that really happens and is popular in the US –  Thuan Jan 13 '11 at 7:36

Geolocation is not exact. There are errors in various Geolocation databases, and IP's can change (that is, they can be reassigned between different registries). So information can be out of date.

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the problem is that Geo-IP is exact in this situation. It is the incoming IP which is weird –  Thuan Jan 13 '11 at 6:22
    
@Thuan - Are you saying that the IP that is assigned to the client is not the IP that you see on the server? –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '11 at 15:38

The problem is that way u only get the name of the client or the last proxy that sent the request.. a request can have many hops from client to server.

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